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Get the spreadsheet name, the current sheet's name and the list of sheets in Google Sheets using Apps Script

In this tutorial, I'll show you how to get the name of the Google Sheets spreadsheet and the names of the sheets it contains via Apps Script. Since these are custom functions, you can also use them in formulas just like you would use any other function in Google Sheets.

How to get the name of the Google Sheets spreadsheet using Apps Script?

How to get the name of the currently active sheet using apps script, how to get the names of all the sheets in the google sheets spreadsheet using apps script, prerequisites.

This tutorial assumes that you're familiar with the basics of Apps Script and Google Sheets. In particular, you should be familiar with:

Custom functions in Google Sheets

Working with Arrays in Apps Script

The push() array method in Apps Script

The forEach() loop in Apps Script

To get the name of the Google Sheets spreadsheet, we need to first get a reference to the spreadsheet and then use the getName() method of the Spreadsheet object to get its name.

Your browser does not support HTML5 video. Here is a link to the video instead.

To get the name of the currently active sheet, we need to first get a reference to the spreadsheet. Then we use the getActiveSheet() method of the Spreadsheet object to get the sheet that is active. Finally, we use the getName() method of the Sheet object to get its name.

To get the names of all the sheets in a Google Sheets spreadsheet, we need to first get a reference to the spreadsheet. Then we need to get all the sheets in it using the getSheets() method of the Spreadsheet object.. Finally, we get the name of each sheet using the getName() method of the Sheet object.

In this tutorial you learned how to programmatically get the name of the Google Sheets spreadsheet and the names of the sheets in it using Apps Script.

Hope you found this tutorial helpful. Thanks for reading!

Stay up to date

I'd appreciate any feedback you can give me regarding this post.

Was it useful? Are there any errors or was something confusing? Would you like me to write a post about a related topic? Any other feedback is also welcome. Thank you so much!

Learn coding using Google Sheets and Apps Script

Google apps script tutorial, sending email from google sheets, build custom user interfaces in google sheets, coding concepts using sheets, recent posts.

google worksheet name

Get Sheet/Tab name in Google Sheets

=REGEXREPLACE(CELL( "address" , Sheet2!A1 ), "'?([^']+)'?!.*" , "$1" )

Sheet2!A1 = tab reference

Get sheet name in google sheets.

Get sheet name in Google Sheets

GET SHEET NAME IN GOOGLE SHEETS — GOOGLE SHEETS FORMULA AND EXAMPLE

Sheet2!A1 = cell reference must be from the same sheet you want to get the name from. It can be blank or containing a value or leave it Cell A1

  • Combine data from multiple Google Sheets tabs and get sheet/tab name
  • Split words by uppercase in Google Sheets
  • Sum by month
  • SUMIF cells if contains part of a text string
  • Sum total sales based on quantity & price
  • Combine date and time
  • Convert 1-12 to month name
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  • Count blank cell
  • Count cell between two values 
  • Combine two or more cell
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  • COUNTIF based on multiple criteria
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  • Transpose row to column

3 Ways to List All Sheet Tab Names in Google Sheets

This post is going to show you the different ways to list all sheet names in Google Sheets.

You may need to create a list of all sheet names in Google Sheets.  But this task can be tedious when you have a workbook with dozens of sheets and need to add an index sheet that lists all the sheet names.

Adding an Index sheet for a table of contents that links to each sheet is a good practice to help organize your workbooks. 

It can be difficult to generate a table of contents or index sheet manually that lists all sheet names.

In this article, you will learn all the different ways to list all sheet names in Google Sheets.

List All Sheet Names with the All Sheets Button

List all sheet names with apps scripts, list all sheet names with apps scripts custom function.

Download a copy of the sample workbook using the above link to follow along with the post.

google worksheet name

There is a small button that’s found in the lower left of a Google Sheets workbook.

google worksheet name

In the sheets toolbar of your Google Sheet workbook, press the All Sheets Button .  You will see a vertical dialog box with the list of all sheet names in your google sheets.

This will show you all the Sheets in the workbook but it also allows you to navigate to any Sheet. Just click on a sheet name and you will be taken to that sheet.

Unfortunately, there is no way to copy these sheet names into the grid.

Apps Scripts is a great way to automate just about anything in Google Sheets and it’s possible to use this tool to generate a list of all the sheet names in a workbook with the click of a button.

Check out the full introduction guide to Google Sheets apps scripts for more details on the amazing tool.

google worksheet name

Follow these steps to open the apps script code editor window.

  • Select the Extensions menu.
  • Click on the Apps Script option.

google worksheet name

Copy and paste the above script into your google sheet code editor and click the Save button.

The above script creates a menu named Sheets with an item named List All Sheets that allows you to trigger your function listSheets .

You can see the additional menu Sheets in the google sheets menu bar when you refresh or open the Google Sheet next time.

google worksheet name

Follow these steps to list all sheet names in Google Sheets.

  • Select any cell and type your header such as Sheet Names .
  • Select the cell below, in this example cell B5 .

google worksheet name

  • Select the Sheets option in the menu that was added by your script.
  • Press List All Sheets option to trigger the listSheets() function.

google worksheet name

You can see the list of sheet names will be automatically added in range B5:B9 .

This results in a static list and you will need to rerun the script if you change any sheet names or add new sheets to the workbook.

There is another way you can leverage Google Sheets apps scripts to automate the generation of a list of sheet names.

You can build a custom function that will return a list of sheet names!

This can then be used like any other built-in function to return the current list of sheet names from your workbook.

google worksheet name

  • Click the Apps Script option.

google worksheet name

Copy and paste the script into your Google Sheet code editor and press the Save button.

The SHEETNAMES() function requires one argument called option .

The function accepts three option values 0 , 1 and -1 . If the option the parameter argument value is not included, the default value is set to 0 .

google worksheet name

Follow these steps to use the SHEETNAMES custom function to list all sheet names in Google Sheets.

  • Select the cell below. In this example, cell C5 is selected.
  • Type =SHEETNAMES() and press the Enter key.

Please note that you did not pass any argument value to your function SHEETNAMES() . The script will set the default value 0 to the option parameter and return a list of all sheet names in Google Sheets.

google worksheet name

You can see the list of sheet names is returned to range C5:C9 .

google worksheet name

Type =SHEETNAMES(1) and press the Enter key if you want to return only the current sheet in Google Sheets.

When you assign the value 1 to the argument, the script will return only the current sheet name.

google worksheet name

You can see the current sheet name of Index in cell D5 .

google worksheet name

Type =SHEETNAMES(-1) and press the Enter key if you would like to list all sheet names excluding the current sheet from your workbook.

Note that you pass the value -1 to the option argument to exclude the current sheet name from the results.

google worksheet name

You can see the list of sheet names excluding the current sheet name of Index in Range E5:E9 .

Using a custom function allows you to list the sheets in a dynamic manner that will update as you change sheet names or add sheets to the workbook.

Conclusions

There are a few ways to get the sheet names from your workbooks.

The All Sheets button is an easy way to see the list of all sheet names in your google sheets, but you won’t be able to get the data into the workbook.

Fortunately, you can use Apps Scripts to generate the list of sheet names for you, and there are two options using this tool.

You can create a script that will add the list of sheets to your workbook or you can create a custom function that lists the sheet names.

You can even exclude the current sheet name from your output which is a great option for creating an index or table of contents sheet.

Do you use any of the tips to list all sheet names in Google Sheets? Do you know any other methods for getting all the sheet names? Let me know in the comments below!

google worksheet name

About the Author

Arnold Layne

Arnold Layne

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10 Comments

Tilak Conrad

Greetings from Sri Lanka – this is superb Arnold – thank you very much for sharing and explaining it all so well.

I am still very much a noob in sheets – I have so many sheets – all over my drive and am slowly doing some housekeeping – checking, moving them into folders etc.

Many of the sheets have code snippets etc that I find useful – some are duplicated etc and are causing me issues in finding/updating.

SO my question is; Is there a way of creating a list or sheet – with – All the names of the sheets in that folder and all the names of the tabs in each of those sheets?

Hope my question is clear.

Thanks in advance and all the very best

John MacDougall

I will note this down and might use it for a future blog post.

That would be great – so far I’ve managed to create a sheet that; lists all the sheets in my Google Drive – with the URL alongside.

Now I just need a script that will work its way down the sheet – using the Sheet Name or URL – and list all the TAB’s in that sheet alongside.

If you do work on something like this – I look forward to seeing it. Feel it would be of interest to others too.

hanks and best regards

Junior

Here is a much simpler way to get the sheet names: function getSheetNames() { const ss = SpreadsheetApp.getActiveSpreadsheet(); const sheets = ss.getSheets();

sheets.forEach(sheet => { let sheetName = sheet.getSheetName(); Logger.log(sheetName); }) }

Nice! Much more compact!

jodi

Is there a way to select which sheets to appear in the list? i.e. This (active) sheet and the sheet to the right/left

PK

Hi John, Thanks for sharing. I am from Thailand. I am using custom function method. But it does not seems lists are updated when renamed or added sheet.

Yes, unfortunately, this is one issue with these methods.

Dale F.

Hi Need a similar help. Is there a way to list all the Sheet Names of a different workbook using a URL or ID? ex. I want to list all the sheet Names of Workbook 1 to work book 2, so that every time we add a sheet in workbook1 it will also be listed in workbook 2.

McKay

Works great, much appreciated! You’ve got some good stuff here!

I just wish there was a way to use custom functions to create the hyperlinks to each sheet so we could create an automatic Table of Contents. I’ve found a workaround that works in a Stackoverflow post that first creates a custom menu and runs a function similar to yours that directly edits a range on the active sheet and uses setFormulas to build the hyperlinks. But it is cumbersome to have to build and run such code (and granting it all the access permissions).

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How to Rename a Worksheet in Google Sheets

Large workbooks often have multiple worksheets contained within them, as it is usually more convenient to contain related information entirely within one file.

The default worksheet naming convention in Google Sheets will label each worksheet with names like Sheet1, Sheet2, Sheets3, etc, which is typically not very helpful in identifying the information contained in that sheet.

Fortunately, Google Sheets will allow you to rename your worksheet tabs so that you can use more descriptive identification. Our tutorial below will show you where you need to go in order to adjust your worksheet names.

Changing a Worksheet Tab Name in Google Sheets

The steps in the guide below will show you how to rename a single worksheet within your Google Sheets workbook. It is important to note that a workbook and a worksheet are two separate things. The workbook is the entire file, and can be renamed by clicking the file name at the top of the window, as in the image below.

rename the workbook

We are going to be renaming just one worksheet within that workbook with the steps below.

  • Step 1: Open the workbook containing the worksheet that you wish to rename. I am renaming a workbook called Test workbook in the image below.

select the workbook

  • Step 2: Click the arrow to the left of the worksheet tab that you wish to rename, then click the Rename option.

click the worksheet tab, then click rename

  • Step 3: Type the new name for the worksheet into the field, then press Enter on your keyboard to save it.

renaming a worksheet

Note that you can also rename a worksheet by right-clicking on the worksheet tab, then selecting the Rename option.

Would you like to streamline the appearance of your Google Chrome browser by getting rid of buttons and features that you are not using? One way to accomplish this is to remove the Home icon that appears to the left of the address bar.

Continue Reading

  • How to merge cells in Google Sheets
  • How to wrap text in Google Sheets
  • How to alphabetize in Google Sheets
  • How to subtract in Google Sheets
  • How to change row height in Google Sheets

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Productivity

How to use Google Sheets: A complete guide

A hero image for Google Sheets app tips with the Google Sheets logo on a green background

I'm no spreadsheet guru, but I have spent copious amounts of time in Google Sheets. From organizing monthly marketing deliverables into a color-coded content calendar to tracking profits for my small business where I upcycle clothing—Google Sheets has proven to be one of my most beloved tools. When used effectively, it can simplify processes and just make your life easier overall. 

In this article, I'll walk you through how to use Google Sheets, go over some helpful formulas, and provide you with some tips and tricks to help you supercharge your work.  

Table of contents:

Overview: Must-know Google Sheets terms

How to create a spreadsheet

How to add data to your spreadsheet

How to edit and format data for easy viewing

How to use formulas in Google Sheets

Additional Google Sheets tutorials and tips

How to share, protect, and move your data

Bonus: How to automate Google Sheets using Zapier

Quick review: What is Google Sheets?

Google Sheets is a spreadsheet app that you can access via the web. So does that mean it's basically just Google's version of Microsoft Excel? Kind of, but not quite.

Is Google Sheets the same as Excel?

If you're familiar with Excel, you'll have an easier time learning how to use Google Sheets. They're both spreadsheet apps, so they have a lot of overlapping features, but there are a few important differences. You can read all about them in Zapier's Google Sheets vs. Microsoft Excel comparison , but here are the main takeaways:

Google Sheets was created with collaboration in mind and makes it easy to share worksheets, grant edit access, and collaborate in real-time. While Excel Online has come out with similar collaboration features, they don't run as smoothly compared to Google Sheets.

Google Sheets recently updated its cell limit to 10 million, but it still pales in comparison to Excel's 17 billion cells per spreadsheet. That makes Excel the better tool for dealing with big data. The good news is that most of us aren't dealing with data sets that large, so Google Sheets works just fine. 

Excel has more powerful formulas and data analysis features, including built-in statistical analysis tools and extensive data visualization options. Google Sheets offers the "lite" version of most of those features, but it's nowhere near as in-depth.

Venn diagram showing the similarities and differences between Google Sheets and Excel.

To kick things off, let's cover some spreadsheet terminology you'll need to know when using Google sheets:

Cell : A single data point or element in a spreadsheet

Column : A vertical set of cells

Row : A horizontal set of cells

Range : A selection of cells extending across a row, column, or both

Function : A built-in operation from the spreadsheet app you'll use to calculate cell, row, column, or range values, manipulate data, and more

Formula : The combination of functions, cells, rows, columns, and ranges used to obtain a specific result

Worksheet (Sheet) : The named sets of rows and columns that make up your spreadsheet; one spreadsheet can have multiple sheets

Spreadsheet: The entire document containing your worksheets

1. How to create a spreadsheet

There are four ways to create a new spreadsheet in Google Sheets:

Option 1: Click the multi-colored "+" button on your Google Sheets dashboard.

Arrow pointing to multi-colored "+" button.

Option 2: Open the menu from within a spreadsheet and select File >  New >  Spreadsheet .

Arrow pointing to "Spreadsheet" button.

Option 3: Click the multi-colored New button on your Google Drive dashboard and select Google Sheets >  Blank spreadsheet .

Arrow pointing to "Blank spreadsheet" button.

Option 4: Type "sheets.new" into your browser. 

This will create a new blank spreadsheet (or a populated Google Sheets template if you choose one of those; for this Google Sheets tutorial, though, you should start with a blank spreadsheet).

Screenshot showing "sheet.new" types into browser.

The Google Sheets interface should remind you of at least one other spreadsheet app you've seen before, with familiar text editing icons and tabs for extra sheets.

Screenshot of the Google Sheets interface.

2. How to add data to your spreadsheet

Look around the white and gray grid that occupies most of your screen, and the first thing you'll notice is a blue outline around the selected cell or cells.

When you open a new spreadsheet, if you just start typing, you'll see that your data starts populating the top-left cell immediately. There's no need to double-click cells when you add information, and not much need to use your mouse.

An individual square in a spreadsheet is called a cell ; they're organized into rows and columns with number and letter IDs, respectively. Each cell should contain one value, word, or piece of data.

Feel free to select any cell you'd like, then go ahead and type something in. When you finish entering data into a cell, you can do one of four things:

Press Enter / return to save the data and move to the beginning of the next row.

Press Tab to save the data and move to the right in the same row.

Use the arrow keys on your keyboard (up, down, left, and right) to move one cell in that direction.

Click any cell to jump directly to that cell.

If you don't want to type in everything manually, you can also add data to your Sheet en masse via a few different methods:

Copy and paste a list of text or numbers into your spreadsheet.

Copy and paste an HTML table from a website.

Import an existing spreadsheet in CSV, XLS, XLSX, and other formats.

Copy any value in a cell across a range of cells via a click and drag.

How to copy and paste data 

Copy and paste is pretty self-explanatory, but there are times when you'll try to copy a "spreadsheet-y" set of data from a website or PDF, and it will just paste into one cell or format everything with the original styling. To avoid pulling your hair out, try looking for data that's actually in an HTML table (like movie data from IMDb, for example) to avoid getting funky pasted data in your spreadsheet. Here's a video showing how to copy and paste data in Google Sheets.

If you do end up with oddly formatted data, don't worry: we'll fix that in the next section!

How to import a file

Importing a file is simple as well. You can either import directly into the current spreadsheet, create a new spreadsheet, or replace a sheet (i.e., an individual tab) with the imported data.

The most common files you'll import are CSV (comma separated values) or XLS and XLSX (files from Microsoft Excel). To import a file from outside of your Google Drive, go to File >  Import >  Upload . Here's a quick video tutorial to demonstrate how.

I prefer to import the data into a new sheet every time to keep my old data and newly imported data separate. Alternatively, if you have a Google Sheet (or a CSV, XLS, or other spreadsheet file) saved in your Google Drive account, you can import that directly into your spreadsheet using the same process—just search your Drive from the import window.

How to autofill data

Dragging to copy a cell value needs a bit of explanation because you'll use this one a lot once you've set up formulas in your spreadsheets.

By dragging the small blue dot (pictured below) in the bottom-right corner of a highlighted cell across or down a range of cells, you can perform a number of different tasks:

Copying a cell's data to neighboring cells (including formatting)

Copying a cell's formula to neighboring cells 

Creating an ordered list of text data

Arrow pointing to small blue square in the bottom right of cell.

Here's an example of how creating an ordered list might work. Try adding the text "Contestant 1" to Cell A1, then click and drag the little blue dot in the bottom-right corner of the highlighted cell either down or across any number of neighboring cells.

If there was no number after Contestant, this dragging action would simply copy "Contestant" to any cells you drag over. But because the number is there, Sheets knows to increment the next cell +1.

Let's assume that you either copied, pasted, imported, or typed in a good chunk of data, and your spreadsheet looks pretty healthy.

Now, how can we use this data?

In addition to the methods I reviewed above, there are even more ways to manually and automatically import data into Google Sheets .

3. How to edit and format data for easy viewing

Whether you're tracking expenses, recording grades, or creating your to-do list , you'll want to sort , manipulate, and format your data.

How to use the Google Sheets toolbar 

The basic formatting options in Google Sheets are available above your first cell. They're labeled in the image below, but for quick reference while you're working on a sheet, just hover over an icon to see its description and shortcut key.

Screenshot of the Google Sheets toolbar showing each icon's function.

Functions like printing, undo/redo, font settings, and font styling work similarly to what you'd expect from your favorite word processor. 

For everything else, the best way to show you how everything works is to dive right into an example.

I'm going to create a quick list of potential breakfast options for tomorrow morning, along with their ingredients, counts, prices, and links to YouTube videos for how to make them (who knew you could make a three-minute video about pouring cereal into a bowl?).

Screenshot of a spreadsheet that shows breakfast options and their ingredients.

For the simple example above, a lack of significant formatting is just ok. It does the basics: storing my information and allowing me to save it. But it's not something I would want to come back to each day.

Since I eat breakfast every morning, let's take some time to make this spreadsheet more user-friendly with some formatting.

How to freeze rows and columns

Working off the same spreadsheet, we'll freeze the first row in place. That means if we scroll down the spreadsheet, the first row will still be visible, no matter how much data lies below it. This allows you to have a long list and helps to keep tabs on what you're actually looking at.

There are two ways to freeze rows:

Click View > Freeze > 1 row in the navigation bar to lock the first row in place.

Hover over the dark gray bar in the top-left of the spreadsheet (until it becomes a hand), and drag between rows 1 and 2.

Screenshot of spreadsheet with arrow pointing to "1 row" button and another arrow pointing to the gray bar in the top left corner.

Freezing my header row is the first thing I do in every sheet I make.

How to hide rows and columns

Now say, for example, that you ran out of bread, so French toast is no longer an option. To temporarily hide that column from your list, you'll right-click Column C and then click Hide column . (Here's a full guide to how to hide rows .)

Screenshot of spreadsheet and menu bar with arrow pointing to the "Hide column" button.

How to format text

Now, let's make the header text pop with some simple text formatting (remember, the text formatting tools are in the toolbar, just above your first row):

Drag to select the cells you want to format

Bold the text

Increase font size to 12pt

Center-align the whole row

Give your cells a gray fill

The next thing I'll do to clean this up a bit is format my "Average Price / Serving" to be a dollar value. Highlight the row, and then click the dollar sign icon to display the selected cells as a dollar amount rather than a regular number. 

Screenshot of spreadsheet with arrow pointing to the dollar sign button.

Read more: How to wrap text in Google Sheets

How to add a sheet

Now, let's say you wanted to make a similar list for breakfast and dinner. Instead of creating a whole new spreadsheet, click the "+" button in the bottom left corner to add additional sheets.

Screenshot of a spreadsheet with arrow pointing to the "plus" button in the bottom left corner.

4. How to use formulas in Google Sheets

Google Sheets, like most spreadsheet apps, has a bunch of built-in formulas for accomplishing a number of statistical and data manipulation tasks. You can also combine formulas to create more powerful calculations and string tasks together. If you're already accustomed to crunching numbers in Excel, the exact same formulas work in Google Sheets most of the time .

For this tutorial, we'll focus on the five most common formulas, which are shown in the formula dropdown menu from the top navigation.

Screenshot of spreadsheet with arrow pointing to formulas SUM, AVERAGE, COUNT, MAX, and MIN.

You can click a formula to add it to a cell, or you can start typing any formula with an equal (=) sign in a cell, followed by the formula's name. Sheets will autofill or suggest formulas based on what you type, so you don't need to remember every formula.

The most basic formulas in Sheets include:

SUM : adds up a range of cells (e.g., 1+2+3+4+5 = sum of 15)

AVERAGE : finds the average of a range of cells (e.g., 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 = average of 3)

COUNT : counts the values in a range of cells (e.g., 1, blank, 3, 4, 5 = 4 total cells with values)

MAX : finds the highest value in a range of cells (e.g., 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 = 5 is the highest)

MIN : finds the lowest value in a range of cells (e.g., 1,2,3,4,5 = 1 is the lowest)

We'll explore these formulas by improving our breakfast spreadsheet.

SUM formula

=SUM(range)

Let's start by adding up the total number of ingredients required for each recipe. I'll use the SUM formula to add each value in the recipes and get a total amount.

There are three ways to use the basic formulas accessible via the top navigation:

Select a range, then click the formula (this will put the result either below or to the side of the range).

Select the result cell (i.e., the cell where you want the result to appear), then click on the formula you want to use from the toolbar. Finally, select the range of cells to perform your operation on.

Type the formula into the result cell (don't forget the = sign), then either manually type a range or select the range.

I'll demonstrate all three methods in a video tutorial here . First, I'll sum my ingredients by selecting a range and clicking SUM from the formula menu. Second, I'll select a result cell and highlight the range of cells that will sum together. Finally, I'll demonstrate typing a formula and range manually. When you're done selecting the cells that you want to add together, press Enter / return .

Now that there's a formula set up to sum all of the ingredients together, you can select the formula cell and drag the blue dot across the other cells to copy the formula to those cells.

COUNT formula

=COUNT(range)

Now that we know how many parts are needed for each recipe, I'd like to know how complicated it is to make. I've simplified this by assuming that fewer ingredients means that the recipe is less complicated.

In order to count the number of ingredients in each recipe, I'll use the COUNT formula. The COUNT formula essentially checks to see if the cells in a range are empty or not and returns the total that are filled. This formula will be set up in my spreadsheet the same way as my SUM row. Watch a tutorial here .

According to my spreadsheet, cereal is the least complicated breakfast, but I'm still not convinced that an easy breakfast is worth it. What if it costs too much? What if the extra effort of cooking another meal saves me money?

Now, I'm going to refine my decision by figuring out the average cost per serving of the breakfast choices by using the AVERAGE formula.

AVERAGE formula 

=AVERAGE(range)

I've added some faux minimum and maximum prices per unit on my ingredients list to the right of my breakfast options. We'll want to get an average price for each ingredient using the low and high rates. 

I'll start by highlighting the range of values (in this case, it's two side-by-side rather than a vertical range) and selecting the AVERAGE formula from the toolbar.

This will drop the result into the column to the right of the maximum price column. Next, I'll drag the formula down to apply it to the rest of the list. Watch how here .

I'll label my column "Average Unit Cost," so we know what we're looking at. 

MIN formula

Let's say I wanted to determine what the cheapest price per unit is of the options. While you could easily just look at the chart and pick it out, this formula is very helpful for large data sets and will save you from scrolling endlessly. See how I use this formula here .

MAX formula

Similarly, if I wanted to determine what the most expensive price per unit is of the options, I would use the MAX formula. See how I use this formula here .

Once you have the hang of the formulas above, there are plenty of other Google Sheets functions to learn.

5. Additional Google Sheets tutorials and tips

Now that you know how to create a spreadsheet, import data, and use formulas, I'm going to walk you through some additional tips. 

How to create a pivot table

A pivot table is a helpful way to analyze and visualize data. To create a pivot table, follow these steps: 

Navigate to Insert >  Pivot table .

In the pivot table editor, add your chosen row and column values.

Next to Values , click Add, and select your desired value from the dropdown menu (you could also choose from one of the suggested pivot table options).

In the example here , I created a faux data set and used a pivot table to show the average training scores of each department. 

In addition to this quick tutorial, there are many different ways to build and use pivot tables in Google Sheets . 

How to use shortcuts to save time

When using Google Sheets, shortcuts can help you save time and work faster. I've listed some of my most-used shortcuts below.

How to create charts and graphs 

An important step of data analysis is visualizing your data, and Google Sheets can help you do just that using charts and graphs . Simply highlight the essential data and click Insert > Chart . A chart will be created, and you can edit it as you like from the sidebar. 

Screenshot of a spreadsheet with a bar chart used to visualize data.

You can play around with the different chart types and find the one that works best for your data set. 

Zapier lets you automatically generate charts and reports in Google Sheets . 

What makes Sheets so powerful is how in sync you'll feel with your coworkers. Jointly editing a spreadsheet is one of the critical functions of Sheets, and Google made it a seamless experience.

Here's how it works:

Click either File > Share or use the green Share button in the top-right.

Enter emails of who can view or edit your spreadsheet.

Select any other privacy options and hit Done .

Screenshot of Google Sheets "share" feature showing how you can add people or groups and grant access.

Once you add people to share with, you can either give them viewing, commenting, or editing access. You can also add an expiration date if you're only accepting comments for a limited time. 

In addition to sharing with specific people, you can also give general access to anyone in your organization or anyone with the link. 

Sharing spreadsheets with your devices and apps

Even though Google Sheets is built for sharing between users, you'll notice that many times, your spreadsheets are created as internal documents, and sharing is secondary to actually getting work done.

You can streamline your spreadsheet workflows and real-time data sharing by taking advantage of these helpful add-ons:

Google Sheets mobile apps. You can use the Google Sheets mobile app to view and edit your spreadsheets, share links on the go, and add users. It's a solid companion to—but not a replacement for—the web app.

Google Drive . Google Drive allows you to easily upload files from your local desktop environment to your online Drive. This makes them accessible to your collaborators and also allows you to quickly import them into spreadsheets and other documents.

A third-party tool like Zapier. You can use Zapier to automatically add data to your spreadsheets, send files to your Google Drive account, alert you of changes to your Sheets—you name it.

Check out Zapier's Google Sheets integration page for more information on supported data and triggers.

Read more: How to lock cells in Google Sheets

How to download data

If you need to send your files to external collaborators, upload a file into another system, or just like having backups, then turn to one of Google Sheets' many data export options.

Screenshot of Google Sheets drop-down menu with arrow pointing to download options.

The most common exports will be either XLS (Excel document), PDF, or CSV (comma separated values). If you're not sure which format to use, a CSV is usually the best bet.

Use your spreadsheet in offline mode

Google Sheets has an offline mode that automatically syncs your changes to the document when you reconnect to the internet. This is useful for any situation where you'd need to treat Google Sheets like a desktop application—on a flight or a road trip, for example.

Here's what you'll need:

Google Chrome

Google Drive Chrome Web App

Google Drive Sync

Instructions for setting up your offline sync are really straightforward, but the bulk of the process is just downloading and using the three core components above.

Navigate to File > Make available offline to turn it on.

Screenshot of Google Sheets drop-down menu with arrow pointing to "Make available offline" button.

And just like that, you can use Google Sheets even when you're offline—no WiFi necessary.

Learn another fun Google Sheets tip: How to add a dropdown list in Google Sheets

7. Bonus: How to automate Google Sheets using Zapier

Google Sheets is a powerful tool—it's everything you'd expect from a spreadsheet with the extra perks of an online app. While the example spreadsheet that we created may have been a bit silly, the practical applications of using Sheets for your workflows (both business and personal) are limitless.

Once you get the hang of Google Sheets, use Zapier to automate specific tasks like savings URLs , creating Google Calendar events , and more. Depending on your industry, there are other super specific things you can do like: 

Automatically add subscribers to Mailchimp from Google Sheets

Automatically update inventory

Connect Google Sheets to any app with webhooks

Automatically save Shopify orders to a Google Sheet

And with everything stored in Google Drive, you'll never worry about losing your files again—even if your computer dies.

This article was originally published by Michael Grubbs in July 2016. The most recent update was in March 2023.

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Shea Stevens

Shea is a content writer currently living in Charlotte, North Carolina. After graduating with a degree in Marketing from East Carolina University, she joined the digital marketing industry focusing on content and social media. In her free time, you can find Shea visiting her local farmers market, attending a country music concert, or planning her next adventure.

  • Spreadsheets & databases
  • Google Sheets

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How to Name or Rename a Google Spreadsheet

One of the common things when working with Google Sheets is to name or rename your Sheets. Google has made it so easy that you can directly change or edit the names.

1. Name a New Sheet

Step 1: Login your Google Sheet (please refer to How to Create a Google Sheet ), and create a new Google Sheet by clicking " Start a new spreadsheet ";

Step 2: When you first create a new Sheet, Google Sheets will automatically name it as "Untitled Spreadsheet". Click " Untitled Spreadsheet " on the left-top corner, and write the correct names in the box.

Step 3: Google Sheets will automatically save your changes (e.g., "Excel").

2. Name a Sheet

If you have the Sheet already open, you can follow the exact step 1 to step 3 as above.

Alternatively, you can change the Sheets names before you open them with the steps below:

Step 1: Click the " Edit " button right after the " Sheet " name before you open it.

Step 2: Click " Rename " from the drop-down list;

Step 3: Type the proper name in the rename box and click " OK ".

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Educator and Google Developer Expert. Let me help you with Google Sheets and Apps Script.

How to use Google Sheets: A Beginner’s Guide

This Google Sheets tutorial will help take you from an absolute beginner, or basic user, through to a confident, competent, intermediate-level user.

Google Sheets is a hugely powerful tool, for everything from digital marketing to finance modeling, from project management to statistical analysis, in fact, just about any activity involving the recording and analysis of data.

And if you’re (relatively) new, it really pays dividends to learn how to use Google Sheets correctly. This tutorial will help you transition from newbie to ninja in short order!

If you’re new to Google Sheets, then I recommend you start from the beginning of this article.

However, if you’ve used Sheets before, feel free to skip sections 1 and 2, and begin with the Data and basic formulas section.

A template is available for copying to your Drive, to accompany this tutorial:

google worksheet name

What is Google Sheets?

How is it different to excel.

  • How to create your first Google Sheet
  • The Google Sheets editing window
  • Working with data in Google Sheets
  • Editing columns and rows
  • Creating new tabs

Removing formatting

Different types of data, doing math on numbers.

  • Starter functions: COUNT, SUM, AVERAGE
  • Splitting data in cells
  • Combining data in cells
  • Adding comments and notes
  • Sharing your Sheet

Real-time Collaboration

  • Freezing panes for easy viewing
  • Understanding cell references

Basic conditional formatting

  • Sorting & filtering data

Adding Charts

Using the explore feature.

  • BONUS: The VLOOKUP function
  • How to use Google Sheets: Next steps

Google Sheets Essentials course

1. How to use Google Sheets

Google Sheets is a free, cloud-based spreadsheet application. That means you open it in your browser window like a regular webpage, but you have all the functionality of a full spreadsheet application for doing powerful data analysis. It really is the best of both worlds.

No doubt you’ve heard of Microsoft Excel, the long-established heavyweight of the spreadsheet world. It’s an incredibly powerful, versatile piece of software, used by approximately 750 million – 1 billion people worldwide. So yeah, a tough act to follow.

Google Sheets is similar in many ways, but also distinctly different in other areas. It has (mostly) the same set of functions and tools for working with data. In fact, some people mistakenly call it “Google Excel” or “Google spreadsheets.”

With the risk of getting into an opinionated debate about the strengths/weaknesses of each platform, here are a few key differences:

  • Google Sheets is cloud-based whereas Excel is a desktop program. With Sheets, you’ll no longer have versions of your work floating around. Everyone always sees the same, most up-to-date version of Sheets, showing the same spreadsheet data.
  • Collaboration is baked into Sheets, so it works extremely well. Excel is still trying to play catch up here.
  • Both have charting tools and Pivot Table tools for data analysis, although Excel’s are more powerful in both cases.
  • Excel can handle much bigger datasets than Sheets, which has a limit of 10 million cells .
  • Being a cloud-based program, Google Sheets integrates really well with other online Google services and third-party sites.
  • Both have scripting languages to extend their functionality and build custom tools. Google Sheets uses Apps Script (a variant of Javascript) and Excel uses VBA.

For the material we’ll cover in this article, there’s very little difference between the programs, however.

For a deep-dive into the differences between Excel and Google Sheets, have a look at ExcelToSheets.com

Why use Google Sheets?

How’s this for starters:

  • It’s free!
  • It’s collaborative, so teams can all see and work with the same spreadsheet in real-time.
  • It has enough features to do complex analysis, but…
  • …it’s also really easy to use.

Need more convincing? Here are 5 more reasons from Google themselves.

Can it still do advanced stuff?

Absolutely! You can build dashboards , write formulas that make your head spin and even build applications to automate your job. The sky’s the limit!

You’ll find lots of resources on this site for intermediate/advanced level users, as well as comprehensive online training courses .

Ok, where do I get it? How to create your first Google Sheet

If this is your first time with Sheets, head over to the Google Sheets homepage :

Google Sheets Home

Click on the Go To Google Sheets button in the middle of the screen. You’ll be prompted to login:

How to use Google Sheets: Login screen

And then you arrive at the Google Sheets home screen, which will show any previous spreadsheets you’ve created.

Click the huge green plus button to create a new Google Sheet:

How to use Google Sheets: Google Sheets home screen

Opening your first Google Sheet from Drive

You can create new Google Sheets from your Drive folder by clicking on the blue NEW button:

Create a Google Sheet from Drive

When you create a new Google Sheet, it’ll be created in your main Drive folder (your root folder):

New Google Sheet in Drive folder

(Note: Don’t panic if you don’t see the Sheet yet, it may not show up until you’ve renamed it. See next step on how to do this.)

Here you can drag it to a different folder if you wish (to keep things organized). Do this by clicking-and-holding the file, and dragging to where you want it to go:

Moving Google Sheet in Drive

The Google Sheet editing window

This is what your blank Google Sheet will look like:

Blank Google Sheet

You can rename your Sheet in the top left corner. Click on where it says Untitled spreadsheet and type in whatever name you want to give your Sheet, in this example “New Sheet”.

So let’s introduce some key terminology and the fundamental concept upon which spreadsheets work:

How to use Google Sheets: terminology

There are two menu rows above your Sheet, of which we’ll see more further on in this tutorial.

The main window consists of a grid of cells. An individual cell is a single rectangle, at the intersection of one column and one row, and it’ll hold a single piece of data.

The columns are vertical ranges of cells, labeled by letters running across the top of the Sheet.

Rows are horizontal ranges of cells, labeled by numbers running down the left side of your Sheet.

In the example above, I highlighted column E and row 10.

** The fundamental concept of spreadsheets: **

Column E and row 10 intersect at one cell, and one cell only. Thus we can combine the column letter and row number to create a unique reference to this cell, E10. Now when we want to refer to this cell, for example to access data in this cell, we use the address E10 to do that.

Understand this and you understand spreadsheets. The rest is just details!

Entering, selecting, deleting and moving data

Now the fun really starts! Let’s start using this new blank sheet we’ve created.

Click cell A1 (that’s the intersection of column A with row 1, the cell in the top left corner of the Sheet) and you’ll see a blue box around the cell, to indicate it’s highlighted:

Cell A1

Then you can simply start typing and you’ll see the data being entered into that cell:

Cell A1 typing

Hit enter when you’ve finished entering data and you’ll move down to the next cell, having completed your data entry. If you hit the Tab key instead, you’ll move across one cell to the right!

It’s worth pointing out an important nuance here:

Clicking ONCE on the cell highlights the whole cell. Clicking TWICE enters into the cell, so you can select or work with the data only.

If you find yourself stuck inside a cell, you can press the ESCAPE key to deselect the contents and go up a level, to just having the cell selected.

Try it for yourself and see how the cursor shows up inside the cell when you double-click, allowing you to edit the data.

To delete the data we just entered, either click the cell once and hit the delete key, or, click the cell twice and then press the delete key until all your data is cleared out.

Help! I made a mistake

First of all, don’t panic!

Google Sheets saves every step of your work so you can always go back a step (or two) if needed.

Press Cmd + Z if you’re on a Mac, or Ctrl + Z if you’re on a PC and you’ll undo your previous step. Keep pressing and you’ll simply go further back through your changes. (Pressing Cmd + Y on a Mac, or Ctrl + Y on a PC moves your forwards, to redo your last step.)

You can also undo using the Undo arrow on the menu:

Undo arrow

Creating a basic table

Right, with all that in mind, it’s time for a quick exercise.

See if you can create the following table for our fictitious gym membership site, by entering the data into the correct cells (there is no formatting or other tricks used at this stage):

Google Sheets raw table

Feel free to use your own data if you wish. Also note that the dates entered above are in US format, with the Month first, so don’t worry if your table has the Day first.

2. How to use Google Sheets: The working environment

Changing the size, inserting, deleting, hiding/unhiding of columns and rows.

To select a row or column , click on the number (rows) or letter (columns) of the row or column you want to select. This will highlight the whole row or column blue, to indicate you have it selected.

To change the width of a column, or height of a row , hover your cursor over the grey line denoting the edge of the column or row, until your cursor changes to look like this:

Column width cursor

Then click and drag the cursor left or right to change the width of this column. It’s the same process to change the height of rows.

Pro-tip: To quickly change the column width to fit your cell contents, double-click when you’ve hovered over the grey line.

How to add columns in Google Sheets: To insert additional columns or rows, click on the existing column or row next to where you’d like to insert a new column or row. With the column or row selected (highlighted blue), right-click to bring up the options menu, then select Insert Before (or Insert After) for Columns, or Insert Above (or Insert Below) for Rows:

Adding extra rows and columns at end

If you reach the outer edges of a Google Sheet, you’ll notice the rows and/or columns stop. But don’t worry, you can add more.

If you’ve scrolled all the way to the bottom of your Sheet (or added that much data), you’ll notice that you’re given 1,000 rows by default. There’s a button to add more rows if you need, either 1,000 as shown, or any number you wish (up to a limit, more on that below).

Add more rows

If you reach the right edge of the Sheet, i.e. the last column, then you add more columns in the standard way. Right-click a cell in the last column to bring up the menu and then choose to add a column to the right.

Pro-tip: If you want to add more than one column, there’s a trick to do it in one go. As an example, say you wanted to add three new columns to the right side of your Sheet, begin by highlighting the last three columns that are there already, then right-clicking and choosing to insert new columns. It’ll then insert three new columns for you!

Data Limit: Finally, keep in mind that each Google Sheet is limited to 10 million cells, which sounds like a lot but soon fills up. Anyway, you’ll find Sheets slows down considerably before reaching that limit. Most people report a slight slow down with tens of thousands of rows of data and complex formulas and models.

Adding/removing multiple sheets, renaming them

Super easy!

Click the big plus button in the bottom left of your Google Sheet to add a new Sheet (also called a Tab).

How to add a new tab

Why use multiple tabs within your Google Sheet?

Well, like a book with chapters on different topics, it can help separate different data and keep your Sheet organized.

For example, you might have a Sheet solely to record your global settings (any variables like name, email, tax rate, headcount…) and another for transactional data, and yet another for the analysis and charts.

The button with the three bars, next to the plus, is your index button , listing all of the tabs in your Google Sheet. This is super useful when you start having a lot of different tabs to manage.

To rename a sheet, or delete a sheet , click the small arrow next to the name (e.g. Sheet1) to bring up the menu. Here you’ll see the option to rename, to delete, or even hide (and unhide) Sheets.

Rename a Sheet in Google Sheets

For naming, I try to indicate what’s in that tab, so use names like Settings, Dashboard, Charts, Raw Data.

You’ll find all of the formatting options on the top toolbar, so you can center your headings, make them bold, format numbers as currency etc. You may find them all on one single row, or you may find some under the More button, as shown in this image:

Google Sheets formatting

They’re similar to a word processor and pretty self-explanatory. You can always hit undo if you make a mistake (Cmd + Z on Mac, or Ctrl + Z on PC).

Try the following to format our basic table:

> Make the heading bold and size 14px > Center the column headings and make them bold > Center the tier column > Change the date format to 01-Jan-2018 (Hint: the date format is found under the button that says 123 .) > Add a dollar sign, $, to the fee column > Add a border around the whole table.

Here’s a GIF to guide you:

(Note, you can also find the formatting options under the Format menu, between the Insert and Data menu options.)

Alternating colors

Let me show you the option to add alternating row colors (banding) to your tables .

Let’s apply it to our basic table, by highlighting the table and then from the menu:

Format > Alternating colors

as shown here:

Remember, a little bit of formatting goes a long way. If you Sheet is more readable and tidy, people will be more likely to understand it and absorb the information.

This is my number 1 productivity tip in Google Sheets.

To remove all formatting from a cell (or range of cells), hit Cmd + \ on a Mac or Ctrl + \ on a PC.

This will save you so much time when you’re wanting to remove formatting that isn’t yours or that you no longer want or need.

3. How to use Google Sheets: Data and basic formulas

You’ve already seen different data types in Google Sheets in our basic table.

The key point to understand with spreadsheet data is that each cell contains the data itself, and a format applied to that data.

For example, suppose a cell contained:

2 , or 2.00 , or $2 , or $2.00

In each case the underlying data is the number 2, but with a different format applied each time. If we add 2 to each of these cells we get back the number 4 in every case (with formatting applied).

How to use Google Sheets: Basic data types

You’ll notice that currency data, percentage data and even dates are actually just numbers under the hood (dates? Really? Yes, they are, but that’s a discussion for another day). They’re all right-aligned, hanging out on the right edge of their cell.

Text is left-aligned by default.

If you want to force something to be stored as text, you can prepend a single quote, ' before the cell contents. So typing in '0123 will show as 0123 in your cell and be left-aligned. If you omit the single quote mark, then it’ll be stored as a number and show up as 123 without the 0.

Easy-peasy, just like you do on a calculator.

You click the cell you want to do your calculation in, type an equals sign (=) to indicate you’re performing a calculation and then type in your formula, e.g.

Google Sheets calculation

Notice how calculation will show in the formula bar (1) as well as in the cell (2) .

You’ll notice that you get a preview of the answer (in this case, 25) above the formula.

Starting with functions: COUNT, SUM, AVERAGE

Technically you’ve already written your first formula in the section above on math calculations, but really, your formula career begins when you start using the built-in functions (of which there are hundreds!).

Returning to our basic table, let’s count how many members we have, what the total monthly fees are and what the average monthly fees are.

Click on cell B8, type an equals (=) and then start typing the word COUNT . You’ll notice an auto-complete menu comes up showing all of the functions beginning with C, like this:

Formula auto-complete

You can either keep typing COUNT in full, or find it and select in from the list (hover over it and click on it OR hit enter OR hit tab).

Next you’ll see the formula helper window show up, which tells you about the formula syntax and how to fill it in correctly:

How to use Google Sheets formula helper

In this case, the COUNT function is expecting a list of numeric values.

You have to select the range of cells you want to count. So click on B4, hold you mouse down and drag down to B7, so that the four cells are highlighted in orange and B4:B7 is showing up in your function:

Then, close the function with a closing bracket “)”:

Note: COUNT is used to count numbers. If you want to count text (for example the names) then COUNT won’t work (it’ll give you a 0). Instead use COUNTA (with an A at the end), otherwise the method is the same.

Your turn! Try creating a total for the membership fees in cell D8. Follow the same process as the count function, except use SUM and highlight the values in column D.

You’re on a roll, so go ahead and calculate the average of the membership fees. Use the AVERAGE function in cell D9.

Psst, you’ll notice that Google even helps you out sometimes and suggests the exact formula you were after:

Google Sheets average

Here you go:

If you make a mistake with your formula, you’ll see an errors message, probably something like #N/A, #REF!, #DIV/0 etc.

You’ll need to re-enter your formula and correct it before proceeding. These error messages do give a lot of context though, so they’re worth understanding.

What’s the difference between a function and a formula?

Well, both are used interchangeably and rather loosely so I wouldn’t get hung up on it.

For the pedantic, a function refers to the single method word (e.g. SUM) whereas a formula refers to the whole operation after the equals sign, often consisting of multiple functions.

Separating data with the Text to columns feature

Let’s suppose you wanted First Name and Last Name , rather than just simply Name as we have in our dead famous authors membership table. How do we go about doing that?

Well of course, as with everything in spreadsheets, there are lots of ways, but let me show you the easiest, using the Text to Columns feature.

Back to our basic table, create a new column to the right of Name before the Tier column, i.e. create a new, blank column B.

Highlight the four names and click:

Data > Split text to columns…

On the sub-menu that shows up choose SPACE and marvel at how Google Sheets separates the full name into a first and last name. Feel free to rename the columns First Name and Last Name too.

Combining cells

Oh, blast I hear you say! You meant to keep hold of that full Name column as well.

No problem, let’s learn how to combine text so we can rebuild it.

Insert a new blank column between B and C (between Last name and Tier) and call it Full Name , in cell C3.

Add this formula in cell C4:

That’s A4, Ampersand, B4.

What it does is combine the data in cell A4 with the data in cell B4 and output it in cell C4.

Hmm, but this gives an output like this:

CharlesDickens

That’s obviously not good enough! We need a space between the names!

Change the formula to this, by clicking right after the ampersand and adding double quote, space, double quote, ampersand:

Here we’ve told Google Sheets to add a space into the mix, and the output now will be:

Charles Dickens

Voilà, that’s better!

Your formula is sitting pretty in cell C4, but how do you get it to work for the other rows?

You can either: i) right-click, copy, move down to select the next cell, right click again, click paste, or ii) Cmd + C (on Mac) or Ctrl + C (on PC), move down to select next cell, then Cmd + V (on Mac) or Ctrl + V (on PC), or iii) drag the formula down by holding the little blue box at the bottom right corner of the blue highlighting around the original cell.

The neat thing is that as you copy this formula down, the cell references will change from row 4 to row 5, row 5 to row 6, etc., automatically! How cool is that!

(This is what’s known as relative references. More on that in section 5 below.)

Here’s a GIF to show this technique in action:

4. How to use Google Sheets: Killer features

Let’s see some of the unique, powerful features that Google Sheets has, as a cloud-based piece of software.

Comments (and Notes)

Want to add some context to numbers in the cells of your Sheets, without having to add extra columns or mess up your formatting?

Add a comment to a cell!

You can tag people (via their email address) who you want to see the comment too. They can reply and mark it resolved once it’s been acted upon.

You can also add simple notes to cells as well if you wish.

Comments and Notes can also be deleted when not required anymore.

To add a comment to a cell , first select the cell, then right click to bring up the menu of options. Select “Insert comment” and then simply type in your comment.

To tag somebody in your comment , type the plus sign (+) and their name or email address (you’ll see auto-complete options from your contacts, so you shouldn’t have to type in the whole email address).

You’ll notice a small orange triangle in the top right corner of the cell to indicate the comment. The comment will show up when you hover over this cell. If you click on the cell, it’ll also add orange shading to the cell background.

Comments can be edited, deleted, linked to, replied to and resolved (comment disappears from Sheet and is archived).

You can reach and control all the Comments in your Sheet from the big Comments button in the top right of the screen, next to the blue Share button.

(The first time you tag someone in a comment, you’ll be asked to share the Sheet with them. See more on this below.)

You can also add a note to cells in the same way (look for it in the menu next to Insert Comment). It’s like a pared down version of a comment, intended for your own reference.

Share your sheets

(If you just added a comment and tagged someone else, as shown above, then you may have already done this step!)

You can share your Google Sheets with other people. Since it’s on the cloud, they can access your Sheet and see the same, live Sheet that you’re in.

In other words if you make changes, they will show up automatically and in near real-time for everybody viewing the Sheet.

You can have multiple people viewing and working on the same Sheet.

Essentially you have three options to share you Sheet with:

  • View-only access , so that person can not change or comment on any data
  • Comment-only access , so that person can add comments but still not make any changes to the data in the Sheet
  • Editing access , so that person can make changes to the sheet (including comments)

The Sharing options are found by clicking on the big blue button in the top right corner, which will open up the Sharing settings:

Google Sheets sharing settings

You can grab the link (the URL) to the Sheet, choose the share setting (view/comment/edit) and then share that link with people you want to see the Sheet. (1)

Or, you can enter someone’s email address directly, choose the share setting (view/comment/edit) and then share the Sheet directly with the person. (2)

If you want to review the sharing settings or have even more control, click the Advanced options buttons. (3)

The Advanced sharing settings window:

Google Sheets sharing advanced settings

Here you can:

> Grab the sharing link (1) > Review who has access (2) > Change the access rights of anyone listed (3) > Invite new people to access the Sheet (4) > Change the advanced owner settings, to restrict who can control the sharing settings and specific view/comment rights (5) > Confirm when you’re finished (6)

I’ve used the link from the sharing settings to share the template for this tutorial with you!

Ok, so you’ve shared your Sheet with someone. If they open it whilst you’re still working in the Sheet you’ll see their cursor show up on whatever cell (or range) they’ve selected. It’ll be a different color, for example green to your blue.

If they enter data or delete data you’ll see it happening in real-time!

In this case my active cell is the blue-outlined cell . I see somebody else, denoted by the green-outlined cell , show up in this Sheet and enter data into a few cells before deleting it.

5. How to use Google Sheets: Intermediate techniques

Freeze panes.

This is one of the most useful tricks you can learn in Google Sheets, which is why I’m recommending you learn it today.

Sooner or later you’ll work with a table of data that continues beyond the area you see on the screen (right now for example, I can see as far as row 26, but it depends on your screen size and other factors).

When you scroll down to look at data further down in your table, you lose the column headings off the top of your screen, and therefore can’t see the context of your columns.

Of course, scrolling up and down to see what the column headings are makes no sense. It’s a sure path to spreadsheet errors and insanity!

Have a look at this data table showing the tallest buildings in the world, which extends below the bottom of what you can see on a single screen in Sheets. Scrolling results in the heading row disappearing, so you no longer know which columns are which:

What you need to do is freeze the heading rows.

Thankfully it’s super easy.

Click on the row number of the row with your column headings in (e.g. row 3), then from the menu choose:

View > Freeze > Up to current row (3)

Now your headings will stay in place. Ah, that’s much better!

You can do the same with columns, if you wished to freeze names for example, so you can scroll horizontally across lots of columns of data.

Relative/Absolute references

This is arguably the hardest concept to grasp in this tutorial. If you understand it and can apply it, then you have a really good understanding of how spreadsheets work and you’re well on your way to being a skilled user.

Suppose you have some data in cell A1 and you enter the following formula into cell B1:

This formula will retrieve whatever data is in cell A1 and show it in cell B1.

Now copy the formula (Cmd + C on a Mac, or Ctrl + C on a PC) and paste it (Cmd + V on a Mac, or Ctrl + V on a PC) somewhere else on your Sheet, for example cell D5.

Nothing will show up in D5. In fact you may be wondering whether your copy-paste worked. Have a look in the formula bar and you should now see this however:

The formula is there, but it points to a different cell, not A1, so does not show the data from A1.

But it still points to the cell that is ONE TO THE LEFT AND ON THE SAME ROW as the original formula.

Ah ha! Eureka!

The formula copied perfectly, keeping the same structure, pointing to the cell on the left.

This amazing property is called a relative reference , meaning it’s in relation to the cell where the formula is (e.g. one to the left).

That’s why you can drag formulas down columns and they’ll change automatically to calculate with data from their row.

Now then, if you want to fix your formula (for example so it always point to cell A1) then you’ll want to use what’s called Absolute Referencing .

We lock the cell reference in the formula, so Google Sheets knows to not move the reference when the formula is moved.

The syntax uses a dollar sign, $, in front of the column reference and in front of the row reference to lock them each respectively, like so:

Now, wherever you copy this formula, the output will always point to cell A1 and return you the data from cell A1.

Google Sheets Absolute and Relative references

Note, you can just lock the column or just lock the row reference, and leave the other part as a relative reference, but that is beyond the scope of this tutorial.

Working with formulas across sheets

Sticking with the topic of referencing other cells for the moment, how does one go about linking to data on a different Sheet?

Returning once again to our basic gym membership table for dead famous authors, in Sheet 1, let’s retrieve the table heading and print it out in Sheet 2 with this formula, entered into cell A1 on Sheet 2:

Note the exclamation point at the end of the reference to Sheet1, i.e. Sheet1!

Now let’s do a simple sum of data on Sheet 1, but show our answer on Sheet 2.

In cell A3 in Sheet 2, enter the following formula:

This will return the sum of the range of cells F4 to F7 in Sheet 1 and print out the answer in Sheet 2.

Conditional formatting is a powerful technique to apply different formats (for example background shading) to cells based on some conditions.

Let’s see an example of conditional formatting, that is, formatting based on variable conditions.

For example, in a financial model, you might show positive asset growth with a green font color and a light green background, whilst negative growth might be shown with red lettering on a light red background. This gives extra context to your numbers, and pre-attentive attributes (the colors) help to convey the message more efficiently.

Taking the plain copy of the membership table (hit Cmd + Z on a Mac, or Ctrl + Z on a PC to go back if you need), highlight the final column of the membership fee, then from the menu:

Format > Conditional formatting

Here you can choose a rule, for example, values less than $100 and highlight them red:

How to use google sheets conditional formatting

Notice the range is shown (1) , then a drop-down menu to choose a rule (2) and then the formatting option (3) , which is default red in this case, although you can go completely custom if you choose.

The power of conditional formatting is to highlight data dynamically. The formatting is based on a rule, so if another value should drop below the threshold ($100 in this case), it will trigger the formatting rule and be highlighted red.

Sorting data

Sorting your data is a common request, for example to show transactions from highest revenue to lowest revenue, or customers with the greatest number to least number of purchases. Or to show suppliers in alphabetical order. You get the idea.

So let’s sort the dead famous authors gym membership table, from earliest members to most recent members, i.e. we’ll sort our table based on the date column.

Highlight the whole table, including the header row. Then from the menu:

Data > Sort range…

and be sure to check the “Data has header row” option. Then you can select the column you want to sort by, and sort option from A to Z, or Z to A.

Google Sheets sort range

This re-sorts the table, showing the earliest members first:

Google Sheets sorted table

Filtering data

The next step after sorting your data is to filter it to hide the stuff you don’t want to see. Then you can just look at the data that is relevant to the problem at hand.

Taking the world’s tallest buildings data again, let’s apply a filter to only show skyscrapers built before the 2000s.

Click somewhere inside the data table (click on a cell containing data in the table), and then add the filters from the menu:

Data > Filter

or by clicking this icon on the menu bar above your Sheet:

Google Sheets Filter

You’ll notice a light green shading applied to row and column headings of your filtered table, and also a green border around your table. Most importantly though, you’ll now have little green filter buttons in each of your heading cells.

To filter out all the buildings built in the year 2000 or after, click the little green triangle next to the column heading Built , to bring up the filter menu.

You’ll notice you can manually select or de-select items to show. Let’s create a rule this time though.

Under the “Filter by condition” section, choose “Less than” and enter 2000 into the value box:

Google Sheets filter

You’ll see a reduced table with just 9 results. The 9 skyscrapers built before the year 2000:

Google Sheets filtered table

To remove the filter, click the green triangle button again (now solid green) and under the “Filter by conditions” set the rule to “None”.

There’s also a native FILTER function, by which you can formulaically filter your data.

As a final exercise with the tallest building data, let’s draw a chart to show the buildings built by year, so we can see the trend graphically.

First, let’s sort the table by the year Built column, from oldest to newest. We can do this using the sort function that is provided in the menu when you click on the green triangle (from the filter).

Then highlight this single column called Built and from the menu:

Insert > Chart

This creates a default chart in your window and opens the chart editing tool in a sidebar.

Here you can change your data range and chart type, as well as a multitude of chart custom formatting options (which are also generally accessible by clicking on the elements directly in the chart).

A chart is an object in your Sheet now. Click it to select it, so it has a blue border around it. You can resize it and drag it to move it, just as you would with an image.

The robots are coming!

Soon we won’t have to create complex formulas or charts ourselves. We’ll simply ask our Sheet to do it for us. Sound far-fetched?

Well, you can do that now! The future is here.

(Soon we won’t have to open Google Sheets at all, we’ll simply type, or more likely speak, our data questions into a dashboard console, and out will pop the answers, but I digress.)

Google Sheets has a feature called Explore, powered by Machine Learning/AI/Deep Learning/Neural Network sorcery, that will ingest your data, analyze it and show you some common answers (like the SUM, COUNTs etc. we’ve seen so far) and basic charts:

Google Sheets explore button

Let’s see an example, using the data about the world’s tallest buildings. Highlighting the column showing the years when each skyscraper was built and then clicking on the Explore button (bottom right corner) leads to these insights:

Google Sheets Explore insights

52 buildings in my set. The earliest tower on the list was built in 1931 (the venerable Empire State Building!) and the most recent was built in 2017. The average of all the years built is 2007.

Some interesting and useful data points, without having to do a lick of work!

I mentioned charts, so let’s see an example of that with the Height (ft) column. Google Sheets Explore creates a Histogram for us, showing the distribution of tower heights:

Google Sheets Explore chart insights

We also get this interesting and insightful summary:

“Ranges from 1,148 to 2,717, but 80% of values are less than or equal to 1,480.”

Wow! At a glance, we have the min and max heights, but more impressive, we know that 80% are under 1,480ft tall.

Not all of the “insights” are useful, and I don’t use this feature much myself yet, but it shows a glimpse of how we’ll all work with Sheets in the future.

If you’re still not worried about AI taking over your job (whether that’s data analysis work or something else) in the next 10 to 50 years, then have a read of this article .

BONUS: VLOOKUP

No “How to use Google Sheets” article would be complete without at least a quick look at the VLOOKUP function .

Because it’s the most famous function. Tell anyone you work with data and spreadsheets and they’ll immediately ask, “yes, but do you know how to do a VLOOKUP?”

It’s a good bellwether for spreadsheet competency, even though there are ultimately better ways to work with data. It’s also a relatively advanced formula compared to what we’ve seen so far, so if you can understand it, it bodes well.

What does it do then?

It’s used to search for a term and return information about that term from a different table.

Generally, it’s used when you have two tables that share some common attribute (e.g. a name, ID number, or email), but otherwise, store different information. Suppose you want to bring this information together though. Well, you can, and you link the information via that common attribute.

One table might have details an employee’s name and address, and the other table might have their name and work details like title and salary. You can use the VLOOKUP function to bring these bits of data together in a single table.

The syntax is as follows:

In words: you select a search term that you search for in the first column of the search table. If you find it, you return a piece of information from the search table that relates to the search term (because it’s on the same row). The column number refers to which column of the search table you return the data from (1 being the column you searched in, so typically this number is 2 or greater).

Let’s see an example, by adding addresses to the dead famous authors’ gym membership table.

I’ve added a second table to Sheet 1, showing the addresses of our dead famous authors. What I’d like to do is add that data to the original gym table.

I want to do it efficiently with the VLOOKUP formula, rather than adding them manually. Not only is it much, much faster with larger tables (imagine ten thousand rows of data), but it’s also less error-prone.

The address table is in columns I and J, with the names in column I and addresses in column J.

So I’ll search for my author name in column I and return the address from column J, and print the output into whichever cell I created my formula in.

The formula is:

And this is what’s happening:

Google Sheets VLOOKUP

I search for the name (1) in the search table (2) and return the data from column 2 of the search table (3) .

I don’t expect you to understand all of this immediately (and there’s a lot more to this formula than what I’ve shown here), but if you try it out and persevere, you’ll get there and realize it’s actually not too difficult.

(The FALSE argument, the final piece of information in the VLOOKUP formula means you want to do an exact match. 99.9% of the time you use a VLOOKUP, you’ll want to use FALSE.)

6. Next steps

The old adage “Practice makes perfect” is as true for Google Sheets as anything else, so hop to it!

Keep up-to-date with new articles, course launches and exclusive offers, by signing up for my Google Sheets newsletter , and get my free Google Sheets ebook with 100 tips.

When you’re ready, check out the intermediate and advanced Google Sheets tutorials on this site.

Check out my Google Sheets Essentials course for beginners.

Check out my free Advanced Formulas 30 Day Challenge course .

If all else fails, ask for help on the Google Sheets forum .

Wow, that’s it for this Google Sheets tutorial! Happy spreadsheeting!

Looking for a Google Sheets expert to help with your next project? Schedule a consult today with a Ben-approved Google Sheets expert.

55 thoughts on “How to use Google Sheets: A Beginner’s Guide”

A great overview of everything to get started in Google Sheets. I can highly recommend the “Advanced Formulas 30 Day Challenge”, it has a wealth of handy bits of info and all with short easy to understand videos. Thanks Ben!

Thanks Jock!

For anyone looking, here’s the link to the Advanced 30 Course: https://courses.benlcollins.com/p/advanced30/

Hi, this is super, thank you. just one thing, I want to build a spreadsheet to place on a website and I want people to be able to add their amounts and the formula to work out the answer from their new info. Is this possible? any advice and help greatly appreciated. For this work have you thought of a donate button

Must say, I have enjoyed Beginners Guide on Google Sheets. I would recommend this to all beginners. Very good overview and simple to follow.

Thank you, Ben.

Thanks Marius!

Can I please sort by number? Our company only uses the order number or date? That would be lovely.

great guide!

Awesome Ben! Question: whats your recommendation to turn sophisticated data heavy sheets for teams, into apps? Basically what SmartSheet, Knack, etc currently do, would love to know if you have a blog/ recommendations on this?

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Great beginners guide! I’ve been learning by trial and error and this helps it all make sense! Thanks for sharing.

My rows are so small I can’t figure out how to change. Took a screenshot example but I cannot paste it on here.

Two GS for Excel people beginner’s tips. One I have a solution for, one not. 1. There’s no ‘clear contents’ option in GS, that I know of. But backspace works to clear values from a selected range of cells. 2. Excel has a ‘clear’ option for Autofilter. In GS, it’s not obvious. So if I have 20 columns autofiltered, and I want to show all data, there seems to be no way to know everything is showing without taking off the filter totally and then reapplying it, and checking to see all the columns are properly filtering.

You’re correct. Not having the “clear all filters” is a major omission I think! I wrote a small macro to do this. Check out example 6.12 in this article: https://www.benlcollins.com/spreadsheets/google-sheets-macros/#examples

Cheers, Ben

how do you print a spreadsheet

Go to the menu: File > Print

Or: Ctrl + P

How do I delete the numbers on the side and letters on the top when I print my spreadsheet in GS?

Great tutorial for beginners.

Can you tell me why emails entered in my google sheets are not always read as emails? I have entered several email addresses that work fine,and others do not work at all

In the app version, there is no menu. File, view, edit, etc. frustrating.

Have you ever thought about writing an e-book or guest authoring on other sites? I have a blog based upon on the same ideas you discuss and would love to have you share some stories/information. I know my viewers would enjoy your work. If you are even remotely interested, feel free to send me an email.

I have a sheet I created in Excel and when I do it in sheets it won’t allow me to set parameters for pages the same way data overflows from one page to the next I’m using that sheet as a real estate agents price sheet there are many listings. No matter what I try the Mac program either sheets or pages will not allow me to format the pages correctly is that or is there a better program

help me to Create a model consisting of the Dashboard in one worksheet and another worksheet in which you should input the data using both Absolute (named cells) and Relative Referencing a) The model should auto generate the RefNo. For each sale using the TEXT and ROW functions in Excel b) Using Data Validation, the model should allow the user selects the Institution from a dropdown list. c) Using Data Validation and If Statements, the model should allow the user selects the Product from a dropdown list and the corresponding unit price should be displayed. If no Product is selected, the value displayed under the Price should be “Select Product” to instruct the user to select the product. d) Using Data Validation, validate the quantity entered if the maximum quantity allowed per transaction by the model is 120 Litre e) Using icons sets, highlight the Quantities as follows i. A red cross (X) if the amount is between 5 to 10 ii. An amber exclamation mark (!) if the amount is between 11 to 25 iii. A green tick() for values the are great than 25 f) The model should calculate both the Sales before and After Tax and include data bars showing the performance of the Sales Amounts.

very much helpful for the beginners I am very grateful to you..

If you can send a starting file with the data table/s (dashboard and input) as you want them we can work on that sheet to achieve your requirements. To maintain privacy send a excel sheet that we can start with. I will do what I can

I am trying to filter a spreadsheet, and I want to lose the rows/columns with blanks. How do I do this?

Can how lock the cell when data is enter another can not change it. How can do this?

Men!!!… that is amazing stuff on “GOOGLE SHEETS” i have ever seen. the way you teach all that things on every topic is awesome & also those links for some humans like me who are eagerly waiting to know each topic in deep,talking straight forward i want to know that are you also available for “GOOGLE DOCS” & “GOOGLE SLIDES” ??

Great tutorial

A great read for beginners and experienced pro’s alike, I have been using and developing on gsheets for YEARS and have never checked out a couple of these features like explore. Definitely doing that now 🙂

This is 2 years behind, but can I ask how do I set up “special paste link” (from Excel i think) to connect cells from one google sheet file to another? I used to simply enter = and click on the cell of another google sheet file and its content shows up. Help?

You need to use the IMPORTRANGE function to connect separate Google Sheet files.

Thank you its really useful for me

Great tutorial Ben, I also want to ask permission to link your tutorial on my site as well as translate it to indonesian

Is it possible to start sheets with less than 1000 rows and 26 columns? The way I use sheets, I am taking extensive time to highlight and delete 980 rows and 20ish columns.

Is it possible to open up more than one tab at a time in the same worksheet and view them side by side?

Brother, your tutorial article are awesome! Thank you!!

I am used to using n Excel spreadsheet to keep up to 35 golfers averages for 10 rounds, adding the latest score and keeping an average for handicap purposes. We golf 3 to 4 days per week and with Excel I just take the saved spreadsheet, use “save as” to make a new days sheet, make the changes and “save.” Then delete to previous titled spreadsheet. After the next day of golf, I “save as” and title the new sheet with that most resent day and delete the old one. How do I do this with Google Sheets? I see no “save” in the menu.

Hi Donald, Try “File > Make a copy”

Hi, I just made my first sheet; it’s an annual spending by months; so I finished the year of 2020 and now I want to continue with a new sheet for 2021. I copied the sheet and then renamed it, deleted the 2020 data, but it doesn’t add the cells like I had before. How do I get a new sheet with all the titles and the formulas and blank data cells? Thank you

Did you try to “duplicate” the sheet

Is there a way to open a Google Sheet to a 50% zoom by default? I’m sharing a sheet with some folks and I need it to open at that value.

How can we edit an editors name from end users perspective (under edit history)? The shared files I’m on at the moment only shows the admins name and everyone else editing the spreadsheet shows as “anonymous”. Help! I really want to keep track of who is making each edit for tracing purposes. Thank you

That’s probably because the people who are editing aren’t logged in to their google account. If you look at the top right hand corner of the page, then you will see a list of all the people currently viewing the page. If they’re not logged in, it will say “Anonymous AnimalName”. If you want to REQUIRE people to be logged in in order to edit, then change your share settings to invite only. The downside to this is that you will have to either manually invite or approve a request to edit for every editor.

I have been searching in many places but have only found one vague reference to a bug… Is there any way to keep a chart within the rows that you freeze? Regardless of how I have created my charts, once I freeze the rows, my charts move below the last frozen row. Sounds like this bug (if it is a bug?) has been known since at least 2019, just curious if there is a workaround? I have a need to keep the charts in view as the user scrolls down through and modifies the data and being able to keep the charts within the frozen rows will be very useful! Thank you!

Hi Tom, unfortunately, there’s no way around this. I don’t think it’s a bug necessarily, I think it’s just the intended behavior.

hi i want to know thatt-& sign stand for which

in this query =QUERY(sheet2!B1:K,”Select * Where B='”&B2&”‘”)

Just wanted to point out that the cell limit for a Google Sheets was changed to 10,000,000 either early Jan 2022 or late Dec 2021 from the previous change that was 5,000,000.

James/mreighties 🙂

Thanks, James! Updated the article.

Excellent product that I have been using for the last few weeks.

Thank you so much Ben. You made it simple to learn more about google sheets. Is there a way to import or upload an excel sheet or its content unto a live sheet? i have so much work on an excel sheet that i will like to convert to live sheet so others can work on it in real-time. Thanks

Hi Ben. Great review; I’m recommending it to some of my co-workers and reports.

However, I’ve got one major point of difference with you, and that’s your inclusion of Vlookup(). IMO, Vlookup() is the most painful to use, overly complicated, fragile function that exists. It is easily made obsolete by using Filter().

Filter() is intended to take a larger range of data and filter it into a smaller range. But it can easily be used to filter into a range of 1! Just set the conditions so that the criteria is the searchable row (what would be the left-most row in Vlookup()). It’s so much faster and easier. No counting columns. No ensuring that the row you are using to search is on the left. No breaking the formula if a new column gets inserted.

Now you might say “What if the row you’re using to search has your criteria listed more than once?” The unique() or index() formulas can help you there.

Anyway, I hope that you add a section about Filter(). I discovered it about a year ago, and it has (without exaggeration) changed my life. It deserves to be better understood and taught, IMO, especially to new users.

Hi Ben A very helpful introduction thanks. I have a question though. I collect suggestions for future lecture topics and speakers for our local University of the Third Age (U3A). I want to collect this information from our members using Google Forms and save the responses to Sheets. I can keep limit most responses to short text such as email, name, topic key word but I also want to give respondents the chance for a long-form answer eg topic abstract. Will this produce problems in my spreadsheet and if so do you have any suggestions as to how I could better handle this? Many thanks, Jan

Great for beginners!

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Reference data from other sheets

google worksheet name

Want advanced Google Workspace features for your business?

Try Google Workspace today!

google worksheet name

Within a single spreadsheet, you can replicate data and copy it from one sheet to another.

Get data from other sheets in your spreadsheet

  • On your computer, go to docs.google.com/spreadsheets/ .
  • Open or create a sheet.
  • Select a cell.
  • Type = followed by the sheet name, an exclamation point, and the cell being copied. For example, =Sheet1!A1 or ='Sheet number two'!B4 .

Note: If a sheet name contains spaces or other non-alphanumeric symbols, include single quotes around it (as in the second example).

Get data from other spreadsheets

Important: To reference a cell or range of cells in another spreadsheet, you must use the IMPORTRANGE function. 

To pull data from other spreadsheets, use the IMPORTRANGE function .

Need more help?

Try these next steps:.

google worksheet name

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Name Tracing Practice - Original

Kids all learn at different paces, but one of the best ways to start with writing is having your child practice their name. Not only is it an important early skill that they’ll use, it’s also something that they’ll want to practice. But, names can be so diverse! That’s why I’ve created this free editable name tracing worksheet printable so your child can practice writing their name.

New name tracing worksheets available:

  • Name Tracing Practice Pack
  • Seasonal Name Tracing Practice

Free Editable Name Tracing Worksheet Practice Printable

Most children don’t need to be able to write well by the time they enter kindergarten but even preschool classes work on teaching name recognition. That includes both identifying and writing a child’s name.

When preschoolers are first learning name writing it’s important to make things really simple for them. Personally, I love to use name tracing worksheets to help develop those early writing skills. 

Why Use a Name Tracing Worksheet Generator?

Did you know that there are over five thousand popular first names in the US alone? That’s an awful lot of variation even if your child doesn’t have a super unique name. It would be impossible to create tracing name worksheets for each and every name like we do with other early words.

That’s where this name tracing worksheet generator works great. You can customize it with your child’s exact name (both first and last!) even if you use unique spelling. 

This writing worksheet generator replaces blank name tracing worksheets because you can finally customize them to say anything you want!

How to Use Name Tracing Worksheets

These free name tracing worksheets for preschool are perfect for developing those beginner writing skills in kids. All you have to do is insert your child’s name and how many times you’d like the name repeated.

When you’re working with young children start with less repetitions. Too many can be overwhelming, plus the larger words are easier to trace for little ones. Then as they gain confidence in their writing you can make the letters smaller and include more lines.

You could start with your kid’s first name, then move on to including the middle and last name. Or have them practice names of family members and friends!

What Font Should I Use For Name Tracing?

I love this name tracing generator because you can choose from multiple fonts. Which font you go with depends on your child’s age, abilities, preferences, and your learning goals. 

It’s popular for parents, especially when doing preschool and kindergarten age name writing practice, to opt for dotted letters that can be traced over. Writing formation guides are optional and it really depends on the kid. Try experimenting with different font styles and see what works best for you. 

Printable names in bubble letters are great for beginners or if you’re doing other crafts with their name. To turn the name writing worksheet into a custom name craft just enter the name with one repetition with the paper set to landscape.

You can also use this free name writing generator to help kids practice handwriting their name. A lot of schools are starting with cursive instead of printing. If that’s something you want to work on at home choose the cursive font when creating your printable. 

Why Should Kids Learn to Write Their Name?

I usually recommend starting early with name writing because it’s something most kids will find useful even from a young age. Unlike other words, preschoolers have plenty of reasons to write their names.

With name writing practice kids will be able to label their own artwork, sign their name on cards (Valentine’s Day is a great opportunity to practice name writing!), and it helps with general word recognition.

Since it’s more practical than other words it’s easier to keep preschoolers focused when practicing name writing. They’ll still develop important pre-writing skills like muscle strength, pencil grip, and letter formation while also getting to write something that relates to their life.

Finally, most preschoolers can identify their name. It can be challenging to convince pre-readers to write words they can’t yet read.

How to Make Name Writing Practice More Fun 

Even enthusiastic kids can get burnt out on name tracing worksheets. It’s really important to make sure kids have fun while developing preschool skills. If something is too boring you might start getting resistance in the future when the pressure is higher to teach these early skills.

My best advice is to allow the child to lead in your learning. What that means is providing tracing name worksheets and encouraging kids to do them without being forceful. If they’re completely uninterested, pause and try again at a different time or when they’re older.

Another great way to make things fun is by turning the activity into something more than just writing practice. For younger children you could use the bubble letter font to create a colouring page. Then have them decorate their name however they want. 

I’ve also created activities for my kids by painting the letters of their names and decorating them with stickers . These are both great for kids of all ages! Pre-writers will practice letter recognition and older kids can get creative. 

For older children who need to practice their writing skills try changing out the names with other things they find interesting like TV show characters or friends’ names.

Can You Use These Free Name Tracing Worksheets With Older Kids?

Writing practice isn’t just for preschoolers and kindergarten students. Even older kids can benefit, especially if they’re learning cursive. 

You can also use these writing practice printables to practice spelling. Just insert the spelling words and have your older kids trace over them on the worksheet. To encourage concentration on each letter you can have them alternate what colours they use to write. 

Writing practice worksheets are also a great way to practice spelling and vocabulary in a second language at any age.

How Can You Make Your Own Name Writing Printables?

The printable name tracing worksheets generator is completely free and available on the Create Printables website. You can use it to create your own name writing paper in guided printing, handwriting/cursive writing, bubble letters, and more. 

They’re perfect for your preschool aged kids, kindergarten writing practice, homeschool families, and even working on writing skills with older children. 

Name Tracing Practice - Original Preview

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Google Sheets  - Working with Multiple Sheets

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Google Sheets: Working with Multiple Sheets

Lesson 11: working with multiple sheets.

/en/googlespreadsheets/formatting-cells/content/

Introduction

A Google spreadsheet can contain one or more sheets . When working with a large amount of information, you can create multiple sheets to help organize your spreadsheet and make it easier to find information.

In this lesson, you'll learn how to create , rename , move, delete, and duplicate sheets.

Using multiple sheets

When you create a new Google spreadsheet, it has one sheet , which is named Sheet1 by default. In the sheets toolbar located at the bottom of the window, you will see a tab for each sheet you have. To organize your spreadsheet and make it easier to navigate, you can create, rename, delete, move, and duplicate sheets.

Watch the video below to learn how to create and manage multiple sheets.

To create a new sheet:

In our example, the sheets of our service log are organized by month. We'll create a new sheet in the log so data can be entered in the new month.

Clicking the Add Sheet command.

Alternatively, you can create an additional sheet by clicking Insert and selecting New sheet from the drop-down menu.

Clicking Insert and selecting New Sheet.

To rename a sheet:

Renaming a sheet.

To switch to a different sheet:

Selecting the desired sheet.

If you want to limit collaborators from editing specific sheets of your spreadsheet, you can protect these sheets by clicking the desired sheet tab and selecting Protect sheet... from the menu that appears.

Protecting a sheet.

To move a sheet:

Moving a sheet tab

To duplicate a sheet:

Selecting Duplicate

To copy a sheet to another spreadsheet in Google Drive, click the tab of the sheet you want to copy, then select Copy to... from the menu that appears. Select the spreadsheet where you want to place the copy from the list that appears. A duplicate of the sheet will appear in the other spreadsheet.

To delete a sheet:

Selecting Delete

  • Open our example file . Make sure you're signed in to Google, then click File > Make a copy .
  • Delete the sheet titled Sheet 1.
  • Duplicate the January sheet and rename it May.
  • Move the sheet you just renamed to the right of the April sheet.
  • Create a new sheet and rename it June .
  • Open the May sheet.

multiple sheets challenge example

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How-To Geek

How to rename columns or rows in google sheets.

Labeling columns or rows of data can help you speed up your spreadsheet work.

Quick Links

What are named ranges, using the name box, using the named ranges menu, using a named range in google sheets.

If you're creating a Google Sheets spreadsheet for others to use, you can make it easier to refer to certain sections of data by renaming columns or rows using named ranges. Here's how.

Named ranges allow you to add a custom name to a group of cells, from entire columns or rows to smaller groups of cells. Creating a named range doesn't overwrite the original cell references (A1, A2, etc.), but it does make it easier to refer to these cells (and the data contained within them) when you're adding new formulas.

The quickest way to add a named range to Google Sheets is to use the name box. This is the box, positioned to the left of the formula bar, that shows you the cell reference for the cell or cells that are currently selected in your spreadsheet.

To begin,  open your Google Sheets spreadsheet  and select a new column or row. With the row or column selected, replace the existing cell reference in the name box with a new name, and then press the Enter key to save your choice.

To quickly rename a column or row, select the row or column, then replace the cell reference in the name box with your own name before pressing the Enter key to save.

Google Sheets will apply the new name to your column or row immediately. You can view a list of existing named ranges by pressing the downward-facing arrow button positioned to the right of the name box.

A list of named ranges, including their original cell references, will appear in the list below.

To view a list of named ranges, press the downwards arrow button next to the name box.

You can click on any of the named ranges to select those cells or press "Manage Named Ranges" to make changes to existing named ranges.

Another way to rename columns or rows is to use the named ranges menu. This menu allows you to manage existing named ranges as well as create new ones.

Adding a New Named Range in Google Sheets

To begin, open Google Sheets and select the row or column that you wish to rename. With the column or row selected, right-click the selected cells and select "Define The Named Range" in the context menu.

To apply a new named range to a selected row or column, right-click the selected cells, then press the

The "Named Ranges" menu will open as a panel on the right. Type your chosen name in the box provided. You can also change the selected column, row, or smaller cell range by changing the cell reference below it.

Press "Done" to save your choice.

In the

Editing or Removing Named Ranges

To edit or remove a named range, right-click any cell in the spreadsheet and select "Define Named Range" in the menu. You'll see a list of existing named ranges in a sidebar on the right side of the window. Hover over the name in the "Named Ranges" panel and press the "Edit" button.

To edit a saved named range, hover over the name (or select it) in the

You can then make changes to the named range (including changing the name and the cell range that it refers to) using the boxes provided. If you want to delete the named range, press the "Delete" button.

To delete a named range, press the

You'll need to confirm your choice---press "Remove" in the pop-up box to confirm.

To confirm the removal of a saved name range, press the "Remove" button in the pop-up menu.

With the new named range added, you can now refer to it elsewhere in a new formula. For instance, if you named your range "CellData," you could find the median value  of the values in those cells by using the following formula:

=MEDIAN(CellData)

The named range (CellData) replaces the original cell reference to the column, row, or cell range in your formula. For instance, if CellData is a named range for all of the cells in column A, you could use either A:A or CellData to refer to those cells.

An example MEDIAN formula using a named range.

Using a named range allows you to quickly refer to the data that you wish to use without requiring the original cell reference. It's just one more way to use the power of Google Sheets to make things easier while you work.

Related: The Beginner's Guide to Google Sheets

google worksheet name

An Easy Guide to the Google Sheets Named Range Function

  • Last updated September 19, 2022

Named ranges can be a great way to increase productivity. It gives cell ranges a name — meaning that instead of having to use cell addresses every time in formulas, you can use the names in formulas.

This can be fantastic for simplifying complex spreadsheets.

In this article, we will go through the process of creating a Google Sheets named range.

Table of Contents

Why Use Named Ranges In Google Sheets

There are several benefits to using named ranges in Google Sheets. You can assign your variables a unique name that helps you remember them for later use and helps others understand your code.

In short, using named ranges makes your spreadsheet easier to read and understand.

Using them makes it easier to make changes to your spreadsheet as you only need to make changes to one specified range rather than going to different places in the spreadsheet, which can get tedious.

You just need to edit the range name once, and all your formulas will use the updated range, which helps prevent future errors due to an outdated cell range reference. Named ranges also make it very easy to jump to the correct cells .

Rules to Follow When Creating a Google Sheets Named Range

To create named ranges, Google Sheets requires you to stick to some rules. Here are a few things to know when creating named ranges:

  • It can’t be more than 250 characters.
  • It can’t start with several “true” and “false”.
  • It can’t have any punctuation or spaces. You can use an underscore instead of a space. For example, write “net_worth” instead of “net worth”. Named ranges can only have numbers, letters, and underscores in them.
  • It can’t be the reference of a cell or a range. You can not name it C4 as it already refers to a cell. Similarly, you can’t name it B1:B50

Note that when you use Google Sheets named range functionality across multiple sheets to import a range , the named ranges should still be there, but sometimes, you may have to rename them.

How to Make a Named Data Range in Google Sheets

Creating a named range in Google Sheets is very simple. You can do this in four straightforward steps. To do this:

google worksheet name

Step 1: First, highlight the data you want to create the named range for and click on Data on the top bar. From the menu, click on Named ranges. You should see a sidebar appear on the right side of the screen.

google worksheet name

Step 2: On the sidebar, you can enter the name in the first text box , while the second one defines that range. Make sure the name you choose follows the rules mentioned above. You should be able to see the range in the second text box. If you dont, you can either type it in or use the grid icon beside the text box to choose the range.

Step 3: Once done, simply click on Done  to save the changes.

google worksheet name

Step 4: You should see that your range is saved into a list. Google Sheets makes it possible to create multiple named ranges. To do this, simply click on Add a range  and repeat the same process as before.

Google Sheets can also name a single cell with the same process.

How to Edit a Google Sheets Named Range

If you need to change the name of the range or change the number of cells in it, you don’t have to delete it and go through making it again. You can edit Google Sheets named ranges by following these steps:

Step 1: Click on Data on the top bar and click on Named ranges.

google worksheet name

Step 2: Hover your cursor over the named range that you wish to edit, and you will see a pencil icon show up. Click on it, and you should see the menu which allows you to edit the range.

Step 3:  Make the necessary changes in the range and simply press Done.

Using a Keyboard Shortcut to Name Ranges in Google Sheets

Add a named range with a keyboard shortcut

  • Highlight the data you wish to make a named range out of
  • Press Ctrl + J which will move your typing curser to the naming box
  • Type the name for the range
  • Press Enter

If you’re wondering how to name a cell in Google Sheets. You follow the same process as above, but select a single cell instead of a range in step 1. 

How to Use Named Ranges in Google Sheets

Now that you’re done creating a range, you’ll need to know how Google Sheets references a named range . You just need to put the range’s name as the RANGE arguments in any function that uses ranges. There are hundreds of functions that use ranges, whether they’re direct or indirect. Yet, if you want to make a dynamic named range in Google Sheets, you can use the INDIRECT function .

For example:

  • To get the sum of the data in the named range, use =SUM(name_of_range)
  • To get the average of the data in the range, use =AVERAGE(name_of_range)
  • To find the maximum value in the data, use =MAX(name_of_range)

Here’s a sample of how Google Sheets could use named ranges in a formula. In the image below, we used the name range “onetoseven” with a SUM function:

Using a formula in with named ranges

Using Scripts with a Named Range In Google Sheets

You can create automation using Google App Scripts  for named ranges. To interact with named ranges, you can use these codes.

Frequently Asked Questions

What are named ranges in google sheets.

The named ranges feature allows you to assign keywords to a group of cells. This will enable you to input the keyword into a formula when doing calculations rather than remembering the cell address.

How Do You Use Named Ranges?

You can use named ranges by selecting the cells you want to apply the named ranges function on, and going to the Data tab , you can see the option to select Named ranges  where you just have to choose the name for your range.

What Is the Advantage of Using a Named Range?

Using names for cells allows you to remember them easily rather than learning the range address. Selecting the range will show its name in the name box rather than the address of the cells.

How Do I Change a Named Range?

You can change a named range by clicking on Data on the top bar and clicking Named ranges . There, you should see a list of the named ranges. Simply hover your cursor over the named range you wish to edit. Click on the pencil icon to go to the edit menu.

What Is a Google Sheets Dynamic Named Range?

You can create a named range using a formula rather than assigning static cells. This can be very powerful for spreadsheet users as you won’t have to go and update the named range every time you add a new entry into your spreadsheet.

A Google Sheets dynamic range is particularly useful in cases where new data is input into the spreadsheet frequently, such as sales data.

Do Named Ranges Slow Down Google Sheets?

If an entire column range is selected in a named range, it will slow down google sheets as sheets will run calculations across all the cells in the row or the column, even if they’re blank. We recommend only setting up the needed cells in named range as this can dramatically increase the speed at which Google Sheets performs calculations.

Use Named Ranges to Improve Productivity

Using a Google Sheets named range is a straightforward process that allows you to be more productive. It makes your workflow more streamlined and accessible. We hope this article helped you better understand what named ranges are and how to use them in your spreadsheets.

If you learned something from this article and enjoyed it, perhaps you’d like to learn more. Check out our reviews of the best available Google Sheets courses  on the web.

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How to reference worksheet with space in name

enter image description here

By this formula both A1 and A2 should display the value of Sheet Space!E8 & Sheet Space!E9 cell respectively.

But as the Sheet Space Worksheet has space in it's name and I can't add apostrophe ' to sheet name manually (as the sheet name is reproducing Dynamically).

Please note that I can't add apostrophe in C1 manually as Sheet Space in C1 also comes dynamically from another cell.

So how can I edit the formula so that It will not display #REF! in A1 and A2 ?

  • microsoft-excel

Máté Juhász's user avatar

This looks like your previous problem with the added twist that the sheet name consists of several words. Excel handles those references by surrounding the sheet name in single quotes (apostrophes). So the reference string in cell A1 would be:

Converting that to an INDIRECT reference you can copy down the column would look like this:

You were on the right track with what you needed to do. With INDIRECT, you can build the cell reference with a combination of literal strings, cell references, and formulas. So you just build what you need as a string.

BTW, those single quotes don't hurt anything if the sheet name doesn't contain spaces. So this version of the formula can be used with any kind of sheet name in C1.

Community's user avatar

  • Is there a reason to use & vs. CONCATENATE other than being shorter? (Personally I like using literal operators for my literals & strings, but I'm curious about Excel.) –  Tanner Strunk Dec 23, 2020 at 18:53
  • @TannerStrunk, it's strictly personal preference. Excel converts either representation to the same internal form for processing. –  fixer1234 Dec 24, 2020 at 20:00

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google worksheet name

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How to Name Columns in Google Sheets

google worksheet name

Lee Stanton Lee Stanton is a versatile writer with a concentration on the software landscape, covering both mobile and desktop applications as well as online technologies. Read more December 1, 2020

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As you may have noted, columns in Google Sheets already have their default headers. We’re talking about the first cell in each column that will always be visible, no matter how much you scroll down. That’s very convenient, right? However, there’s one problem. Their default names range from A to Z, and there’s no way to change them.

But don’t worry. There’s another trick you can use to name columns in Google Sheets. In this article, we’ll explain how to name them the way you want and make everything more convenient.

You always see A-Z columns because they’re frozen; they don’t disappear even when you scroll down and all other cells disappear. You can’t change their names, but you can freeze cells from another row and give them any name you want. That’s the way to change the default column headers and add your own names.

If you’re using Google Sheets in your browser, here’s what you have to do:

google worksheet name

There you have it. The row with column names is now frozen, which means you can scroll down as much as you want, but you’ll still be able to see your column names at the top. They’re your new headers, actually.

You can also sort and filter data by simply clicking on the column header. However, you first need to enable this feature. Here’s how:

google worksheet name

You’ll see the green icon in each header, and you can simply click on it to sort and filter data.

How to Name Columns in Google Sheets on iPhone

You can name columns using your iPhone as well, but you need to have the Google Sheets app. It’s not possible to do it from the mobile phone browser. Download the app, and we’ll show you how to name columns by changing headers and freezing them. The process is similar to what you do on your computer, but the steps are a bit different.

Here’s what you have to do:

google worksheet name

Freezing rows in the iPhone app is even easier than on a computer, as you’ll see a gray line dividing the frozen row from the rest of the document. It means you did everything correctly. That’s your new header. Now, simply enter the name of each column. When you scroll down, you’ll notice that the title doesn’t move, so you’ll always be able to see the column names. So convenient!

How to Name Columns in Google Sheets on Android

If you have an Android phone, there are two ways to name columns. While the first way is similar to the iPhone’s process, the second is a bit different. It consists of naming a range of cells. We’ll show you both ways so you can decide which one is more convenient for you. Before we start, make sure to download the Google Sheets app for Android.

Here’s the first method:

google worksheet name

  • Repeat the process for the first cell in each column.

There you have it You’ve just created headers with column names that are frozen and won’t move even if you scroll to the end of the document. However, if you’d like to try another method as well, here’s what you have to do:

google worksheet name

Unfortunately, you can’t edit named ranges in the Google Sheets app. To do so, you may need to open the spreadsheet on your computer.

How to Name Columns in Google Sheets on iPad

Naming columns using your iPad is very similar to naming columns using your iPhone. Of course, everything may depend on the model you’ve got, but the process is generally similar. Download the Google Sheets app for the iPod, and let’s get started. Here’s what you have to do:

  • Open the app.
  • Open your spreadsheet.
  • Tap and hold the first row to highlight it.
  • You’ll now see a menu. Depending on your iPad model, you should tap on “More options” or the three-dot sign.
  • Choose “Freeze.”
  • Select “1 row.”
  • Now, double-tap each cell in the first row and enter the names.

There you have it. You’ve just created a custom header with column names that will always stay on the top of your document. The best thing is that Google Sheets automatically syncs, so when you open the spreadsheet on your iPhone or Mac, you’ll still be able to see the headers you’ve created.

How to Name Cells in Google Sheets

We’ve explained everything about naming columns, but what if you simply want to name a range of cells? There’s an easy way to do it, and we’ll explain everything you need to know. This can be very helpful, especially if you’re dealing with a lot of formulas. Instead of typing “A1:B10” every time, you can simply type your custom name, such as “budget” or “expenses.”

Here’s how to name cells in Google Sheets:

google worksheet name

That’s it. If you want to name more cells, simply select another range of cells in your spreadsheet. If the field is too large to select with your mouse, you can choose it by typing the cell range in the text box.

Bear in mind that the name can’t contain any spaces or punctuation. Also, it can’t start with a number, although it can include numbers.

How to Change Column Names in Google Sheets

The most challenging part is to name columns and create new headers. Once you’ve done so, changing column names will be effortless for you. Here’s what you have to do:

There you have it. No matter what you rename it, this cell should stay your header. However, Google Sheets sometimes has trouble with some headers, and it may change your settings. But there’s nothing to worry about and if this happens, all you have to do is freeze that row again.

Additional FAQs

How to alphabetize google sheets columns.

If you want to sort the columns alphabetically, first select all the columns you want to alphabetize. Then, open the top menu and click on “Data.” Click on “Sort sheet by A to Z.” Alternatively, you can also select “Sort sheets by Z to A” if you want to alphabetize them the other way around.

If you want to keep your headers and sort all other cells, make sure to select the “Data has header row” option. That way, Google Sheets will exclude your titles from sorting and treat them as a separate row, just like they should be.

How Do I Make a Column Header in Google Sheets?

Making custom headers in Google Sheets is very easy. All you have to do is add a blank row to the top of your document. Enter the name of each header and then freeze that row. If you’re using the Google Sheets app, you’ll see a gray line that’s now separating the column header from the rest of the cells.

The cells in the frozen row will function as column headers as they will stay on the top. You’ll always be able to see them, even if you scroll to the bottom of the document. You can also exclude your headers from formatting and format all other cells in your spreadsheet.

Many people aren’t particularly fond of the default column names in Google Sheets. They aren’t very helpful when you’re dealing with a lot of data, and letters A-Z probably won’t be useful to you. Thankfully, there’s a way to name columns the way you want and to make the names stick. We hope that this article was useful to you and that you’ve learned something new.

Do you customize columns and rows in Google Sheets? Is there any other trick that helps you organize your columns? Let us know in the comments section below.

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How to Get Sheet Names in Excel?

You may want to get the worksheet’s name while working with Excel.

For example, when creating a report that includes multiple worksheets, you may have the sheet name as a header or footer to help users navigate the report. 

Of course, you can manually type in the names, but the names will not automatically update if you rename the worksheets.

This tutorial shows four methods of getting the sheet name in Excel, and the name is automatically updated if it is changed. 

Table of Contents

Method #1: Using TEXTAFTER and CELL Functions to Get the Worksheet Name in Excel

The TEXTAFTER function, only available in Excel 365, returns text that occurs after a given character or string. The CELL function returns information about a cell’s formatting, location, or contents.

We can use a formula that combines the two functions to get a worksheet name in Excel.

Let’s consider the following workbook, “Employee Performance Appraisal Reports,” which has five worksheets with different names:

Excel file with various worksheets

We want to return the name of the current worksheet, “Qtr 1 2022”,  in a cell in the workbook using a formula that combines the TEXTAFTER and CELL functions.

We use the following steps:

  • Select any cell in the active worksheet; in this case, we select cell A1 and enter the below formula:

Note: This formula only works if the workbook has been saved at least once. Otherwise, it returns the #N/A error because it cannot locate the workbook.

TEXTAFTER formula to get the current worksheet name

  • Press Enter.

The name of the “Qtr 1 2022” worksheet is returned in cell A1 as shown below:

current worksheet name is shown in the cell

We get the respective worksheet names if we copy the formula to the other worksheets in the workbook.

For example, when we copy the formula to cell B2 of the “Qtr 2 2022” worksheet, the worksheet’s name is returned in the cell as seen below:

dynamic formula that changes based on the worksheet name

Explanation of the formula

The CELL function’s info_type   argument is set to “filename,” and reference to cell A1 to return the full path to the active worksheet, as seen below:

CELL part of the formula

The returned full path is then fed into the TEXTAFTER function as the text argument. The delimiter argument is set to “]” to extract only the text that is after the closing square bracket (“]”).

In our example, the result is “Qtr 1 2022”, the name of the active worksheet.

Method #2: Use a Formula Combining MID, CELL, and FIND Functions to Get Sheet Name in Excel

Another easy way to get sheet names in Excel is by using a combination of MID, CELL, and FIND functions.

  • The MID function returns the text string characters from inside a text string, given a starting position and length.
  • The CELL function returns information about a cell’s formatting, location, or contents.
  • The FIND function is case-sensitive and returns the starting position of one text string within another.

We can use a formula that combines the three functions to get a worksheet name in Excel.

We have the following workbook, “Employee Performance Appraisal Reports,” which has five worksheets with different names:

Excel file with various worksheets

We want to return the name of the current worksheet, “Qtr 1 2022”,  in a cell in the workbook using a formula that combines the MID, CELL, and FIND functions.

  • Select any cell in the current worksheet; in this example, we select cell A1 and enter the formula below:

Note: This formula will only work if the workbook has been saved at least once. Otherwise, the formula returns the #VALUE! error because it cannot locate the workbook.

MID formula to get the current worksheet name

The current worksheet’s name is returned in cell A1 as seen below:

current worksheet name is shown in the cell

If we copy the formula to any cell in the other worksheets, the worksheet’s respective name is displayed in the selected cell.

Let’s, for example, copy the formula to cell G1 of the “Qtr 1 2023” worksheet:

dynamic formula changes based on the worksheet name

The formula returns the name of the worksheet in cell G1.

Explanation of the formula 

=MID(CELL(“filename”,A1),FIND(“]”,CELL(“filename”,A1))+1,31)

  • CELL(“filename”,A1) – The first CELL function’s info_type argument is set to “filename” and reference argument to cell A1 to return the full path to the active worksheet as shown below:

google worksheet name

The full path to the worksheet is passed to the MID function as the text argument.

  • FIND(“]”,CELL(“filename”,A1))+1 – The FIND function returns the position of the closing square bracket in the full path. The position is increased by 1 to calculate the starting position of the worksheet name. The computed result is passed to the MID function as the start_num argument.
  • Finally, the value 31, the maximum number of characters allowed in a worksheet name, is passed to the MID function as the num_chars argument. The value ensures that the MID function extracts the full worksheet name to the right of the closing square bracket. The final result in our example is “Qtr 1 2022,” the name of the current worksheet. 

Method #3: Using RIGHT, CELL, LEN, and FIND Functions to Get the Worksheet Name in Excel

The RIGHT function returns the specified number of text string characters from the end of a text string. The CELL function returns information about a cell’s formatting, location, or contents. The LEN function returns the number of characters in a text string, and the FIND function, which is case-sensitive, returns the starting position of one text string within another. 

We can apply a formula combining the four functions to get the name of a worksheet in Excel.

Assume we are working on the following “Employee Performance Appraisal Reports” workbook that has five worksheets with different names:

Excel file with various worksheets

We want to use a formula combining the RIGHT, CELL, LEN, and FIND functions to return the name of the active worksheet, “Qtr 1 2022,” in a cell in the workbook.

We proceed as follows:

  • Select any cell in the active worksheet; in this example, we select cell A1 and enter the formula below:

Note: This formula only works if the workbook is saved at least once. Otherwise, the formula returns the #VALUE! error because it cannot find the workbook.

RIGHT formula to get current worksheet name

The name of the active worksheet is displayed in cell A1:

result of the formula that shows the current worksheet name

If we copy the formula to any cell in the other worksheets, the worksheet’s respective name is returned in the selected cell.

Let’s, for example, copy the formula to cell E2 of the “Qtr 3 2022” worksheet:

the result changes based on the worksheet name

The name of the active worksheet is shown in cell E2.

=RIGHT(CELL(“filename”),LEN(CELL(“filename”))-FIND(“]”,CELL(“filename”)))

  • CELL(“filename”) The first CELL function returns the full path to the active worksheet as shown below:

google worksheet name

The worksheet’s path is then passed to the RIGHT function as the text argument.

  • LEN(CELL(“filename”) The LEN function returns the number of characters in the active worksheet’s full path text string.
  • FIND(“]”,CELL(“filename”)) The FIND function returns the position of the closing square bracket in the full path text string. 
  • LEN(CELL(“filename”))-FIND(“]”,CELL(“filename”)) The number returned by the FIND function is subtracted from the entire length of the full path text string returned by the LEN function. The result is the length of the name of the active worksheet. The result is passed to the RIGHT function as the num_chars argument.
  • Finally, the RIGHT function utilizes the text, and the num_chars values passed to it to extract the name of the current worksheet. 

Appending Text to the Worksheet Name

If printing a report that includes many worksheets, we could add more descriptive text to the worksheet name to help users quickly navigate the information. 

For example, if we have a worksheet name “Qtr 1 2022,” we may want to add the text “Employee Performance Appraisal Report for” to the name so that the report’s title reads “Employee Performance Appraisal Report for Qtr 1 2022.”

We can achieve this by joining the formulas we have already described to the additional text we want using the ampersand (&) operator.

For example, the formula below adds the text “Employee Performance Appraisal Report for” to the worksheet name:

appending a text before the worksheet name

We can also use the CONCAT function as in the example below:

concat Formula To append text before the worksheet name

How to List All Worksheet Names in a Workbook Using a Formula

We may want a list of all worksheet names in a workbook.

Suppose we have the following “Employee Performance Appraisal Reports” workbook with a Summary worksheet and five other worksheets.

Summary worksheet to get all sheet names

We want to use a formula to extract a list of the worksheets’ names in the “Summary” worksheet of the workbook. 

  • Select any cell in the Summary worksheet; we select cell A1 in this example.
  • On the Formulas tab, on the Defined Names group, click the Define Name button.
  • On the New Name dialog group that pops up, do the following:
  • On the Name box , type “ List_Worksheet_Names .” Remember, the name should not have spaces.
  • Open the Scope drop-down list and select Workbook .
  • Type the formula “ =REPLACE(GET.WORKBOOK(1),1,FIND(“]”,GET.WORKBOOK(1)),””) ” on the Refers to box and click OK.

New name dialog box

Note: The GET.WORKBOOK function is an Excel 4.0 function that cannot be used directly in cells but works with named ranges.

  • Enter the values 1 to 7 in the cell range B1:B7 as shown below:

enter serial values in a column

  • Select cell C1 and enter the formula below:

Formula to fetch worksheet names by number

  • Drag the Fill Handle to copy the formula down the column to get the following list of names of worksheets in the workbook:

drag the formula to get all worksheet names

  • Save the workbook as a Macro-Enabled Workbook (*.xlsm), so you do not lose the list. Excel informs you accordingly if you attempt to save the workbook as a regular (*.xlsx) file.

save the file as macro enabled file

Explanation of the technique

  • The formula REPLACE(GET.WORKBOOK(1),1,FIND(“]”,GET.WORKBOOK(1)),””) replaces all the characters in each worksheet’s full path text string up to and including the closing square bracket with empty strings leaving only the worksheet name. This formula effectively generates an array of the names of the worksheets in the workbook.
  • INDEX(List_Worksheet_Names,B1) The INDEX function uses the value in cell B1, in this case, one (1), to return the first worksheet name in the array. As the formula is copied to the other cells, it returns the second and third worksheet names, and so on.
  • The IFERROR function that wraps the formula returns an empty string after all the worksheet names in the array have been listed.

Some Use Cases where Getting Sheet Names Could Be Useful

Knowing how to get sheet names in Excel can be useful in many different situations.

Here are some use cases where I have found it useful to quickly know the name of the current sheet name or all sheet names in the file.

1. When Consolidating Data From Multiple Excel Files

When you have multiple Excel files with similar data structures, you may want to consolidate them into a single file.

In this case, knowing the sheet names can help you easily identify which sheets contain the data you need to consolidate.

You can then use formulas or VBA code to extract the data from multiple sheets and combine them into one single sheet or file.

2. When Automating Reports

If you regularly create reports that involve multiple sheets, knowing how to get sheet names can save you time and effort.

For example, you can use VBA code to loop through all the sheets in a workbook and extract data from all the sheets or specific sheets with specific sheet names (such as the year number of department name).

You can also use sheet names to dynamically reference cells or ranges in your formulas or VBA code.

3. Finding Missing Data/Sheet

If you’re collating data and combining different sheets into one Excel file, getting a list of all the sheet names can help you spot if there are any missing sheets that needs to be added.

Getting all the sheet names in a column then can be very useful in such a situation.

4. Data Validation

When creating data validation rules in Excel, you may want to restrict the input to a specific range of cells on a particular sheet.

Knowing the sheet name can help you easily specify the range of cells you want to restrict the input to. This can help prevent errors and ensure data consistency.

5. Collaborating with Others

If you are collaborating with others on an Excel workbook, knowing the sheet names can help you communicate more effectively.

For example, you can refer to specific sheets by name when discussing the data or formulas with your colleagues.

This can help ensure everyone is on the same page and minimize confusion.

This tutorial showed four techniques for getting worksheet names in Excel. We hope you found the tutorial helpful.

Other Excel articles you may also like:

  • Add New Sheet in Excel (Shortcut)
  • Switch Between Tabs/Worksheets in Excel (Shortcut)
  • 3 Easy Ways to Duplicate Sheet in Excel (Shortcuts + VBA)

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Steve Scott

I am a huge fan of Microsoft Excel and love sharing my knowledge through articles and tutorials. I work as a business analyst and use Microsoft Excel extensively in my daily tasks. My aim is to help you unleash the full potential of Excel and become a data-slaying wizard yourself.

1 thought on “How to Get Sheet Names in Excel?”

FYI – effective today, Excel 365 no longer supports Excel 4.0 Macro Functions in a Name. So, Get.Worksheet is no longer supported, lol. Funny, how it came back with a #blocked error.

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How to Separate Names in Google Sheets: A Step-by-Step Guide

Published: January 13, 2024 - 5 min read

google worksheet name

Make your Google Sheets work for you

Google Sheets is a powerful tool that allows users to perform various operations on data, including splitting full names into first and last names. This feature is particularly useful for organizing data and making it easier to sort and filter. If you are looking to separate first and last names in Google Sheets, there are several ways to do so.

Learn How To Separate First and Last Names in Google Sheets

There are several ways to achieve this, but two of the most popular methods are using the SPLIT function and Text to Columns.

Using SPLIT Function to Separate Names

The SPLIT function is a powerful tool for learning how to split full name in google sheets. It teaches you how to separate text into different columns. It works by using a delimiter to split the text into an array. In the case of separating first and last names, the delimiter is usually a space.

To use the SPLIT function, select the cell containing the full name and enter the following formula:

=SPLIT(A2,” “)

This will split the full name into two columns, with the first name in one column and the last name in another. The formula can be copied and pasted into other cells to quickly split multiple names.

Text to Columns for Name Separation

Another way to separate first and last names in Google Sheets is by using the Text to Columns feature. This feature allows you to split text into separate columns based on a delimiter.

To use Text to Columns, select the cell containing the full name and follow these steps:

  • Click on the “Data” tab in the top menu.
  • Select “Split text to columns.”
  • In the “Separator” box, select “Space” as the delimiter.
  • Click “Split” to separate the text into two columns.

Text to Columns is a quick and easy way to split names, but it may not be as versatile as using the SPLIT function. For example, if the names are separated by a different delimiter, such as a comma, Text to Columns may not work as well.

Overall, both the SPLIT function and Text to Columns are useful tools for separating first and last names in Google Sheets. By understanding how these functions work, users can efficiently organize and analyze their data.

It’s also worth noting that Google Sheets has a wide range of other functions that can be used to manipulate data, such as the SUM function for adding up the values of cells. By mastering these functions, users can unlock the full potential of Google Sheets and streamline their workflow.

Advanced Techniques for Splitting Names

If you need to separate first and last names in Google Sheets, there are a few advanced techniques you can use to streamline the process. In this section, we’ll explore two methods for extracting first and last names: using formulas and automating name separation with scripts.

Using Formulas to Extract First and Last Names

One way to split full names in Google Sheets is to use formulas. The LEFT, RIGHT, FIND, and LEN functions can be used to extract the desired components from a full name. Here’s how to do it:

  • Insert a new column next to the column containing the full names.
  • In the first cell of the first name column, use the formula =LEFT(A2,SEARCH(” “,A2)-1) to extract the first name. Adjust the cell references accordingly.
  • In the first cell of the last name column, use the formula =RIGHT(A2,LEN(A2)-SEARCH(” “,A2)) to extract the last name. Again, adjust the cell references as needed.

By using formulas, you can quickly split full names into their individual components without having to manually enter the data.

Automating Name Separation with Scripts

If you frequently need to split full names in Google Sheets, you can automate the process using scripts. Here’s how to do it:

  • Open your Google Sheet and go to Tools > Script editor.
  • In the script editor, paste the following code:

function splitNames() {

  var sheet = SpreadsheetApp.getActiveSheet();

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google worksheet name

  var range = sheet.getDataRange();

  var values = range.getValues();

  for (var i = 1; i < values.length; i++) {

    var name = values[i][0];

    var splitName = name.split(” “);

    sheet.getRange(i+1, 2).setValue(splitName[0]);

    sheet.getRange(i+1, 3).setValue(splitName[1]);

  }

  • Save the script and run it by going to Run > splitNames.
  • The script will split the full names in column A into separate columns for first and last names.

By automating the name separation process, you can save time and reduce the risk of errors when working with large datasets.

In conclusion, using formulas and scripts are two advanced techniques that can help you split full names in Google Sheets quickly and accurately. Whether you’re working with a small or large dataset, these methods can help you streamline your workflow and improve your productivity.

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How to export google sheets files.

Alter your spreadsheet formats in a few simple steps

Sharing spreadsheets created on different programs can be a struggle. Use Google Sheets to export spreadsheet projects, adapt them to other file types, and share them from the app. This can be essential for organizing your spreadsheets into file categories required for tasks like accessing features on different software or adhering to job specifications. Here are the best methods for exporting spreadsheets on Google Sheets.

How to export a Google Sheet on Android and iOS

Exporting Google Sheets files on Android and iOS mobile devices is straightforward, given the streamlined nature of their touch interfaces. This export method can be carried out in a couple of taps, with minimal menu navigation. Here's what to do.

The screenshots used for this section are taken from an Android device. This method can also be used on iOS devices.

Export a Google Sheet using Send a copy

  • Open the Google Sheets app .

A screenshot of the Google Sheets spreadsheet interface

  • Scroll down and tap Send a copy .

A screenshot of the Google Sheets export menu with send a copy highlighted

  • A prompt appears with several apps on which the file can be shared. Tap the app you want to use and tap Always .
  • Send in your selected file type.

How to export using the Google Sheets web app

Exporting a spreadsheet in Google Sheets is varied but simple, with a few options for changing the spreadsheet file type. There isn't a menu option for it. The feature is present in other options that do the same thing. Exporting a file in Google Sheets is easy when you know where to go. Here are two methods for exporting your spreadsheet files.

Download to export a Google Sheet

  • Open the Google Sheets web app .

screenshot of google sheets file and download menus

  • Select your desired file type. Your exported spreadsheet automatically downloads onto your device in that format.

Use Email to export a Google Sheet

Open the Google Sheets app and select File > Email > Email this File . This opens a few fields for you to fill in.

a screenshot of the google sheets file and email menus

Then, enter the following information in the fields:

  • The email address you want to send the file to.
  • The subject of the email (optional).
  • An accompanying message (optional).
  • The file type you want to send. Your options are Microsoft Excel , OpenOffice Spreadsheet , or PDF .

When you're finished, click Send . This emails the entered address with your exported file as an attachment.

a screenshot of the google sheets email menu

Spreadsheet exporting vs. spreadsheet converting

When you export a spreadsheet, you send the file elsewhere in a different format. This can be useful for making the file discoverable by other programs. It also helps you meet the needs of a business partner or client. A good example is exporting your resumé into a PDF file to make it look professional.

Is exportation the same as conversion? The two processes are similar, but they are not the same. The export process is distinctive for its in-house quality, with the adaptation being carried out by the app. Conversion is handled by exterior software like an online file conversion website or other service.

Exporting your Google Sheets is a breeze

Google Sheets is fantastic for group projects and businesses, allowing files to be edited anytime by anyone with access. But not everyone uses Google Sheets. Follow these steps and export your spreadsheets with confidence, whether it's on a Chromebook or your favorite bargain Android phone . If you're looking for strategies to get a handle on your spreadsheet library , we can help.

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February 13, 2024

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HansV MVP  -  Andreas Killer  -  Ashish Mathur  -  Jim_ Gordon  -  Rory Archibald   ✅

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Hello CharlesSindall, I'm Ibhadighi and I'd happily help you with your question. In this forum, we are Microsoft consumers just like yourself. In Excel, you can use the `CELL` function to display the name of the current worksheet. Enter the following formula in a cell where you want to display the worksheet name: =RIGHT(CELL("filename", A1), LEN(CELL("filename", A1)) - FIND("]", CELL("filename", A1))) Replace `A1` with any cell that is not empty on your worksheet. This formula extracts the worksheet name from the full file path. I hope this helps. Best Regards, Ibhadighi

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Taxes 2024: Our Indispensable Cheat Sheet for Filing Your Tax Return This Year

This essential guide can help you find all the answers you need for getting your taxes filed this year.

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Taxes are complicated, but it can help to break down the filing process into simple steps.

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Three weeks into the 2024  tax season , and the IRS has already  sent nearly 7.5 million refunds  back to taxpayers. If you're expecting money back too, submitting your tax return is probably high on your to-do list. And if you plan to file soon, make sure to gather all the necessary paperwork to make filing easier.

Completing your taxes isn't always easy, especially when you aren't a tax professional or up to date with the latest tax laws. The rules vary by year and by person, depending on your filing status, age, income and other factors. 

As you navigate the 2024 tax season, use our cheat sheet to help you find all the answers you need. The resources below provide expert advice on tricky tax topics and can help you start your return. 

Hopefully, these resources can help you file with confidence, get the biggest tax refund possible and minimize stress.

Read more:   File Early and Get Up to 20% Off Your 2023 Taxes With TurboTax

How to get started with your taxes

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As with most tasks, the hardest part of doing your taxes is starting. You have to gather all your necessary forms (and track down any that are missing), pick a service or software to use and then spend hours completing your return.

No wonder almost a third of Americans wait until the last minute to file, according to a survey from financial services company IPX1031 . Filing as early as possible has its advantages to consider.

Here's some info to help you jumpstart your tax return:

  • What Are the Tax Deadlines for the 2024 Tax Season?
  • How to Create an Online IRS Account and Why You Should
  • 7 Good Reasons to File Your Tax Return Early
  • How to File Your Taxes With a Phone or Tablet
  • All the Ways You Can File Taxes for Free
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With the child tax credit tax break, you could be eligible for up to $2,000 per child. The rules around which kids qualify and how much money you could get refunded can be confusing, however. Here's what to know about this benefit.

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Form, forms and more tax forms

There are a lot of tax documents: There's the W-2 your company sends you, assorted 1099 forms for other income, a 1098 form for mortgage interest and many others.

In all, the IRS provides 2,854 different tax forms on its website. Learn about the ones you need in 2024, and what to do if you are missing any.

  • What Is a W-2 Form and What to Do If You Haven't Received Yours
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Review your tax credits and tax deductions

Once you've started your return for tax year 2023, make sure you get every penny owed to you. One way to maximize your tax refund is to check all of the potential tax credits and deductions that could lower your tax bill.

Learn the basics of itemizing deductions (or taking the standard deduction), and review all the ways that you can pay less or get a bigger refund.

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All about tax refunds

After you've finished your 2023 tax return and sent it to the IRS, the waiting begins. Fortunately, the IRS makes it easy to track your return and refund. 

Learn more about how to track your tax refund, whether it's directly deposited or mailed as a paper check, as well as other tips for getting your money quickly and securely.

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  • Get Your Tax Refund Faster With Direct Deposit
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  • How to Protect Your Tax Refund From Identity Theft

What about taxes and Social Security or other government benefits

The rules around taxes and benefits can be baffling. Here are a few guides on what to know about taxes and your government benefits. 

  • Do Social Security Recipients Need to File a Tax Return?
  • Do SSI Recipients Need to File Taxes?
  • Do SSDI Beneficiaries Need to File a Tax Return?
  • Will You Get Your Social Security Check on Time if the Government Shuts Down in March?

Answers to specific tax questions in 2024

Everyone's financial situation is unique, but several common quandaries flummox even the most diligent taxpayers.

Here are a few of the more common tax questions for 2024:

  • Do I Have to Pay Taxes on My State Stimulus Check?
  • Can You Claim a Boyfriend or Girlfriend as a Dependent?
  • Which Divorced Parent Gets to Claim the Child Tax Credit?
  • If Your Student Loan Debt Is Forgiven, Do You Owe Taxes?

How to get help on your taxes

If you can't find the tax answers you need on your own, don't despair. There are free resources that can help get your tax return finished and filed. 

  • How to Get Free Help on Your Taxes
  • Got Tax Questions? Do This Before Calling the IRS
  • CNET Tax Tips

Good luck with filing your return. Be sure to check back as we update this list often with more tax explainers and tips for 2024.

Google employees are posting internal memes poking fun at how many AI models and names the company launched

  • Google just launched another artificial-intelligence model, named Gemma.
  • The company is on a tear, proving it can move fast when it needs to.
  • Even some Google staff are losing track of all the new models and names.

Google is on a heater.

The company just announced yet another new family of artificial-intelligence models named Gemma. These are smaller than Gemini, Google's biggest model, but their technical data is publicly available, and researchers and developers can customize them.

In the past three months, Google has launched Gemini , killed Bard and renamed it Gemini , launched a better version named Gemini Advanced (not to be confused with Gemini Ultra , which is the name of the model), launched another improved version named Gemini 1.5 , launched Gemini for Workspace , and given employees access to an internal version of Gemini trained on Google data, named Goose .

Got all that? It's OK if you're struggling to keep up — even some Google employees are losing track of what's what, as evidenced by the memes they've been cranking out in the company's internal meme generator.

google worksheet name

A Google spokesperson responded with the following:

google worksheet name

  • Main content

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VIDEO

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  2. Day 6: Google Spreadsheet ( Day 2 )

  3. Google Sheet in 6 minutes

  4. Google Sheets MUST DO’s! #teachers #googlesheets

  5. How To Get Definitions Of Words In Google Sheets

  6. Get the Worksheet Name Dynamically In Excel

COMMENTS

  1. How to Get the Sheet Name in Google Sheets (Formula)

    To get the current Sheet name, we first need to create a custom app script that will create a formula that will allow us to do this. Below is the script that you can use for this function GetSheetName () { return SpreadsheetApp.getActiveSpreadsheet ().getActiveSheet ().getName (); } Here are the steps on how to use this:

  2. Google Sheets: Online Spreadsheet Editor

    Google Sheets: Online Spreadsheet Editor | Google Workspace Make data-driven decisions, in Google Sheets Create and collaborate on online spreadsheets in real-time and from any device. Try...

  3. Get the spreadsheet name, the current sheet's name and the list of

    To get the name of the currently active sheet, we need to first get a reference to the spreadsheet. Then we use the getActiveSheet() method of the Spreadsheet object to get the sheet that is active. Finally, we use the getName() method of the Sheet object to get its name. /** * Returns the name of the active sheet. * * @return The name of the ...

  4. 3 Ways to Rename a Sheet Tab in Google Sheets

    The sheets in a Google Sheets document have the default naming convention Sheet1, Sheet2, Sheet3, etc. As you create new sheets in your workbook, you will likely want to change the default name. It is good practice to change the name of a sheet so that it reflects the nature of the data it contains.

  5. Get current sheet name in cell

    Learn how to get the current sheet name in a cell in Google Sheets, using a custom function or a script. Find answers and tips from other Google Docs editors community members.

  6. get sheet name in Google Sheets

    Get sheet name in Google Sheets How to get sheet names in Google Sheets? GET SHEET NAME IN GOOGLE SHEETS — GOOGLE SHEETS FORMULA AND EXAMPLE =REGEXREPLACE (CELL ("address",Sheet2!A1),"'? ( [^']+)'?!.*","$1") Sheet2!A1 = cell reference must be from the same sheet you want to get the name from.

  7. 3 Ways to List All Sheet Tab Names in Google Sheets

    Select any cell and type your header such as Sheet Names. Select the cell below, in this example cell B5. Select the Sheets option in the menu that was added by your script. Press List All Sheets option to trigger the listSheets () function. You can see the list of sheet names will be automatically added in range B5:B9.

  8. How to Get the Sheet Name in Google Sheets

    In this video, I am going to show you how to create a custom formula to get the sheet names in Google Sheets. There's not a built-in formula to do this, but ...

  9. How to Rename a Worksheet in Google Sheets

    Step 1: Open the workbook containing the worksheet that you wish to rename. I am renaming a workbook called Test workbook in the image below. Step 2: Click the arrow to the left of the worksheet tab that you wish to rename, then click the Rename option. Step 3: Type the new name for the worksheet into the field, then press Enter on your ...

  10. How to use Google Sheets: A complete guide

    Option 1: Click the multi-colored "+" button on your Google Sheets dashboard. Option 2: Open the menu from within a spreadsheet and select File > New > Spreadsheet. Option 3: Click the multi-colored New button on your Google Drive dashboard and select Google Sheets > Blank spreadsheet.

  11. How to Name or Rename a Google Spreadsheet

    1. Name a New Sheet Step 1: Login your Google Sheet (please refer to How to Create a Google Sheet ), and create a new Google Sheet by clicking " Start a new spreadsheet "; Step 2: When you first create a new Sheet, Google Sheets will automatically name it as "Untitled Spreadsheet".

  12. How to use Google Sheets: The Complete Beginner's Guide

    To rename a sheet, or delete a sheet, click the small arrow next to the name (e.g. Sheet1) to bring up the menu. Here you'll see the option to rename, to delete, or even hide (and unhide) Sheets. For naming, I try to indicate what's in that tab, so use names like Settings, Dashboard, Charts, Raw Data.

  13. The Beginner's Guide to Google Sheets

    To open an Excel file that you want to edit that's already uploaded, click the file with the green 'X' next to the filename from your Google Sheets homepage. Click either view the Excel file or edit it in Sheets from the dialog that appears. When you finish with the document, you can download it as XLSX, or ODS, PDF, HTML, CSV, or TSV format.

  14. List Sheet Names with Formula

    Create Name Range for Sheet Names. To create a Named Range for the sheet names, in the Excel Ribbon: Formulas > Name Manager > New. Type "Worksheets" in the Name Box: In the "Refers to" section of the dialog box, we will need to write the formula. =GET.WORKBOOK(1) & T(NOW())" This formula stores the names of all sheets (as an array in ...

  15. Reference data from other sheets

    Open or create a sheet. Select a cell. Type = followed by the sheet name, an exclamation point, and the cell being copied. For example, =Sheet1!A1 or ='Sheet number two'!B4. Note: If a sheet name contains spaces or other non-alphanumeric symbols, include single quotes around it (as in the second example). Get data from other spreadsheets

  16. CreatePrintables

    This writing worksheet generator replaces blank name tracing worksheets because you can finally customize them to say anything you want! How to Use Name Tracing Worksheets These free name tracing worksheets for preschool are perfect for developing those beginner writing skills in kids.

  17. 5 Ways to Use Named Ranges in Google Sheets

    1. Adding Links to Cell Ranges For a fast way to jump to a range of cells, you can create a hyperlink. Then with a click, you can move directly to that cell range. By using named ranges, you can simply use that name rather than selecting the range of cells, obtaining the link, and then inserting the link thus eliminating some steps.

  18. Google Sheets: Working with Multiple Sheets

    Using multiple sheets. When you create a new Google spreadsheet, it has one sheet, which is named Sheet1 by default. In the sheets toolbar located at the bottom of the window, you will see a tab for each sheet you have. To organize your spreadsheet and make it easier to navigate, you can create, rename, delete, move, and duplicate sheets.

  19. How to Rename Columns or Rows in Google Sheets

    To begin, open Google Sheets and select the row or column that you wish to rename. With the column or row selected, right-click the selected cells and select "Define The Named Range" in the context menu. The "Named Ranges" menu will open as a panel on the right. Type your chosen name in the box provided.

  20. An Easy Guide to the Google Sheets Named Range Function

    Last updated September 19, 2022 Named ranges can be a great way to increase productivity. It gives cell ranges a name — meaning that instead of having to use cell addresses every time in formulas, you can use the names in formulas. This can be fantastic for simplifying complex spreadsheets.

  21. How to reference worksheet with space in name

    Please look at this picture. By this formula both A1 and A2 should display the value of Sheet Space!E8 & Sheet Space!E9 cell respectively.. But as the Sheet Space Worksheet has space in it's name and I can't add apostrophe ' to sheet name manually (as the sheet name is reproducing Dynamically).. Please note that I can't add apostrophe in C1 manually as Sheet Space in C1 also comes dynamically ...

  22. How to Name Columns in Google Sheets

    Select "Freeze." When the "Freeze" menu opens, select "1 row." There you have it. The row with column names is now frozen, which means you can scroll down as much as you want, but you'll still be...

  23. How to Get Excel Sheet Names? (3 Easy Ways)

    Method #1: Using TEXTAFTER and CELL Functions to Get the Worksheet Name in Excel The TEXTAFTER function, only available in Excel 365, returns text that occurs after a given character or string. The CELL function returns information about a cell's formatting, location, or contents.

  24. How to Separate Names in Google Sheets: A Step-by-Step Guide

    This will split the full name into two columns, with the first name in one column and the last name in another. The formula can be copied and pasted into other cells to quickly split multiple names. Text to Columns for Name Separation. Another way to separate first and last names in Google Sheets is by using the Text to Columns feature.

  25. Google Sheets: How to export files

    Download to export a Google Sheet. Open the Google Sheets web app. Navigate to the upper-left corner of the screen and click File > Download. Select your desired file type. Your exported ...

  26. How do i put the name of a worksheet into a worksheet so that it can

    Harassment is any behavior intended to disturb or upset a person or group of people. Threats include any threat of suicide, violence, or harm to another.

  27. A former Gizmodo writer changed his name to 'Slackbot' and stayed

    The move camouflaged McKay's active Slack account for months, letting his account evade deletion. It also allowed him to send bot-like messages to his colleagues such as, "Slackbot fact of the ...

  28. Taxes 2024: Our Indispensable Cheat Sheet for Filing Your Tax ...

    As you navigate the 2024 tax season, use our cheat sheet to help you find all the answers you need. The resources below provide expert advice on tricky tax topics and can help you start your return.

  29. Google Employees Post Memes Mocking Company's AI Brand Strategy

    Google just launched another artificial-intelligence model, named Gemma. The company is on a tear, proving it can move fast when it needs to. Even some Google staff are losing track of all the new ...